Audit the Federal Reserve

The Federal Reserve is the chief culprit behind the economic crisis. Its unchecked power to create endless amounts of money out of thin air brought us the boom and bust cycle and causes one financial bubble after another. Since the Fed’s creation in 1913 the dollar has lost more than 96% of its value, and by recklessly inflating the money supply the Fed continues to distort interest rates and intentionally erodes the value of the dollar.

For the past 30 years, Congressman Ron Paul has worked tirelessly to bring much-needed transparency and accountability to the secretive bank. And in 2009 and 2010 his unfaltering dedication showed astonishing results: HR 1207, the bill to audit the Federal Reserve, swept the country and made the central bankers shudder at their desks. The bill passed as an amendment both in the House Financial Services Committee and in the House itself.

But the usurpers of America’s future didn’t take it lying down. They weren’t about to allow their secrets to be exposed and their magic money machine to be put under close scrutiny. They worked frantically behind the scenes to quietly derail all efforts to open up the Federal Reserve to an independent audit.

A handful of Fed-loving U.S. senators led by Chris Dodd rewrote the Senate version of the Financial Reform Bill to strip out Ron Paul’s Audit the Fed amendment and actually expand the Fed’s power over banks, lending and money. As Ron Paul commented on here, the Dodd bill completely eliminated legislation to audit the Federal Reserve, which had already passed in the House.

Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) introduced an amendment on the floor effectively adding the Grayson-Paul language to the Senate bill, but later changed his amendment under pressure by the Federal Reserve and the Obama administration. The altered Sanders amendment passed the Senate on May 11, 2010 by a unanimous 96-0 vote.

Sen. Vitter reintroduced an amendment with the original Audit the Fed language. The Senate rejected the amendment on May 11, 2010 by a 37-62 vote.

The House and Senate went to the conference committee which attempted to reconcile the differences between the two bills (and their amendments). Unfortunately, Ron Paul’s tough language ended up not being included in the final bill.

On June 30, 2010, the GOP introduced Ron Paul’s Audit the Fed bill as a motion to recommit, which was the last chance to alter the financial regulation bill. Audit the Fed failed by a vote of 229-198. All Republicans voted in favor of the measure with 23 Democrats crossing the aisle to vote with Republicans. 114 co-sponsors of HR 1207, all Democrats, jumped ship and voted against Audit the Fed.

But let’s start from the beginning. Here’s the fascinating history of Ron Paul’s Audit the Fed bill:

02/2009: Ron Paul introduces bill to Audit the Federal Reserve

On February 26, 2009, Ron Paul introduced HR 1207, the bill to audit the Federal Reserve:

“I rise to introduce the Federal Reserve Transparency Act. Throughout its nearly 100-year history, the Federal Reserve has presided over the near-complete destruction of the United States dollar. Since 1913 the dollar has lost over 95% of its purchasing power, aided and abetted by the Federal Reserve’s loose monetary policy. How long will we as a Congress stand idly by while hard-working Americans see their savings eaten away by inflation? Only big-spending politicians and politically favored bankers benefit from inflation.”

After a groundswell of grassroots support, HR 1207 and its counterpart in the Senate, S 604, went on to attract 320 and 32 co-sponsors respectively.

10/2009: Mel Watt Introduces Competing Placebo Amendment

With HR 1207 gaining momentum, Congressman Mel Watt introduced a competing banker-approved “placebo” amendment that would have replaced HR 1207 and actually increased the Federal Reserve’s secrecy.

11/2009: Victory over Mel Watt Amendment

On November 19, 2009, after a historic debate lasting several hours, Ron Paul’s and Alan Grayson’s “Audit the Fed” amendment passed 43-26 in the House Financial Services Committee. The amendment called for a comprehensive audit of the Federal Reserve and replaced the opposing “placebo” amendment proposed by Mel Watt.

How they voted on Ron Paul’s Audit the Fed amendment (HR 1207 co-sponsors in bold):

Note: Due to a clerical error, until 5/26/2010 this roll call erroneously listed Rep. Gary Miller (CA-42) as a Democrat who supposedly voted “nay”. However, the reality is that Rep. Miller is a Republican who was absent on the day of the vote. He is a co-sponsor of HR 1207. We apologize!


Democrats
MA-04 Rep. Barney Frank nay
PA-11 Rep. Paul E. Kanjorski nay
CA-35 Rep. Maxine Waters nay
NY-14 Rep. Carolyn B. Maloney nay
IL-04 Rep. Luis V. Gutierrez nay
NY-12 Rep. Nydia M. Velázquez nay
NC-12 Rep. Melvin L. Watt nay
NY-05 Rep. Gary L. Ackerman nay
CA-27 Rep. Brad Sherman aye
NY-06 Rep. Gregory W. Meeks nay
KS-03 Rep. Dennis Moore nay
MA-08 Rep. Michael E. Capuano nay
TX-15 Rep. Rubén Hinojosa aye
MO-01 Rep. William Lacy Clay aye
NY-04 Rep. Carolyn McCarthy nay
CA-43 Rep. Joe Baca
MA-09 Rep. Stephen F. Lynch nay
GA-13 Rep. David Scott aye
TX-09 Rep. Al Green nay
MO-05 Rep. Emanuel Cleaver nay
IL-08 Rep. Melissa L. Bean nay
WI-04 Rep. Gwen Moore nay
NH-02 Rep. Paul W. Hodes aye
MN-05 Rep. Keith Ellison nay
FL-22 Rep. Ron Klein nay
OH-06 Rep. Charles Wilson nay
CO-07 Rep. Ed Perlmutter aye
IN-02 Rep. Joe Donnelly nay
IL-14 Rep. Bill Foster nay
IN-07 Rep. Andre Carson nay
CA-12 Rep. Jackie Speier aye
MS-01 Rep. Travis Childers aye
ID-01 Rep. Walt Minnick aye
NJ-03 Rep. John Adler aye
OH-15 Rep. Mary Jo Kilroy nay
OH-01 Rep. Steve Driehaus aye
FL-24 Rep. Suzanne Kosmas aye
FL-08 Rep. Alan Grayson aye
CT-04 Rep. Jim Himes nay
MI-09 Rep. Gary Peters aye
NY-25 Rep. Dan Maffei aye

Republicans
AL-06 Rep. Spencer Bachus aye
TX-19 Rep. Randy Neugebauer aye
DE-01 Rep. Michael N. Castle aye
NY-03 Rep. Peter King aye
CA-40 Rep. Edward R. Royce aye
OK-03 Rep. Frank D. Lucas aye
TX-14 Rep. Ron Paul (sponsor) aye
IL-16 Rep. Donald A. Manzullo aye
NC-03 Rep. Walter B. Jones aye
IL-13 Rep. Judy Biggert aye
NC-13 Rep. Brad Miller
WV-02 Rep. Shelley Moore Capito aye
TX-05 Rep. Jeb Hensarling aye
NJ-05 Rep. Scott Garrett aye
SC-03 Rep. J. Gresham Barrett aye
PA-06 Rep. Jim Gerlach aye
GA-06 Rep. Tom Price aye
NC-10 Rep. Patrick T. McHenry aye
CA-48 Rep. John Campbell aye
FL-12 Rep. Adam Putnam aye
MN-06 Rep. Michele Bachmann aye
TX-24 Rep. Kenny Marchant aye
MI-11 Rep. Thaddeus McCotter aye
CA-22 Rep. Kevin McCarthy aye
FL-15 Rep. Bill Posey aye
KS-02 Rep. Lynn Jenkins aye
NY-26 Rep. Christopher Lee aye
MN-03 Rep. Erik Paulsen aye
NJ-07 Rep. Leonard Lance aye

12/2009: Audit the Fed Passes in the House

The Audit the Fed amendment was attached to Barney Frank’s HR 3996, also known as the “Financial Stability Improvement Act of 2009”. That bill was later combined, along with several other bills, into “The Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act of 2009 – Financial Stability Improvement Act of 2009” (HR 4173). The House passed the new bill on December 11, 2009 on a vote of 223-202.

03/2010: Treasury Officials Still Support Mel Watt Amendment

On March 8, 2010 Huffington Post reporter Sam Stein participated in a bizarre meeting with unnamed high level treasury officials:

The Treasury Department is vigorously opposed to a House-passed measure that would open the Federal Reserve to an audit by the Government Accountability Office (GAO), a senior Treasury official said Monday. Instead, the official said, the Treasury prefers a substitute offered by Rep. Mel Watt (D-N.C.), and would like to see it enacted as part of the Senate bill.

The Watt measure, however, while claiming to increase transparency, actually puts new restrictions on the GAO’s ability to perform an audit.

03/2010: Mel Watt Amendment Used in Senate Version of the Financial Reform Bill

Ron Paul: “In the Senate, we didn’t get enough strong support over there and the Republicans didn’t really fight for it and at the Senate side it is not included. Matter of fact, they have included Mel Watts’s language. His language and my language competed in the House Financial Services Committee and of course we won that pretty easily. But they inserted that in so Mel Watt and the bankers were able to influence the senators enough to put their language in there. So what probably will happen is the two bills will be passed. It’ll be in one bill and not the other and then the fight will be to put pressure on the conference to go with the House [bill] instead of the Senate.”

04/2010: Bernie Sanders Introduces Audit the Fed Amendment in the Senate

Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) introduced an amendment on the floor effectively adding the Grayson-Paul language to the Senate bill.

05/2010: Bernie Sanders Sells Out, Senate Passes Watered Down Amendment

On May 6, 2010 Bernie Sanders sold out to the bankers by modifying his amendment to the extent that it would allow the Fed to keep many of its activities secret. On May 11, 2010 the Sanders amendment passed the Senate by a unanimous 96-0 vote.

05/2010: David Vitter Comes To The Rescue But His Amendment is Defeated

Sen. David Vitter reintroduced an amendment with Ron Paul’s original Audit the Fed language. The Senate rejected the amendment on May 11, 2010 by a 37-62 vote.

06/2010: 114 Democrats Jump Ship and Vote Down Audit the Fed

On June 30, 2010, Ron Paul’s attempt to audit the Federal Reserve, which was previously co-sponsored by 320 members of the House (HR 1207), failed by a vote of 229-198. All Republicans voted in favor of the measure with 23 Democrats crossing the aisle to vote with Republicans. 114 co-sponsors of HR 1207, all Democrats, jumped ship and voted against Audit the Fed.

The GOP had offered the Fed audit as the minority’s last chance to alter the financial regulation bill. The bill does have an watered-down audit provision in the conference report, but it is limited to loans made by the Fed during the height of the economic crisis. Ron Paul’s bill would have allowed a total examination of the Fed’s books.

How they voted

Democrats, Republicans, HR 1207 Co-Sponsors

YEA

Aderholt
Akin
Alexander
Austria
Bachmann
Bachus
Barrett (SC)
Bartlett
Barton (TX)
Biggert
Bilbray
Bilirakis
Blackburn
Blunt
Boehner
Bonner
Bono Mack
Boozman

Boucher
Boustany
Brady (TX)
Broun (GA)
Brown (SC)
Brown-Waite, Ginny
Buchanan
Burgess
Burton (IN)
Buyer
Calvert
Camp
Campbell
Cantor
Cao
Capito

Carney
Carter
Cassidy
Castle
Chaffetz
Childers
Coble
Coffman (CO)
Cole
Conaway
Crenshaw

Critz
Culberson
Davis (KY)
Dent
Diaz-Balart, L.
Diaz-Balart, M.
Djou
Dreier
Duncan

Edwards (TX)
Ehlers
Emerson
Fallin
Flake
Fleming
Forbes
Fortenberry
Foxx
Franks (AZ)
Frelinghuysen
Gallegly

Garrett (NJ)
Gerlach

Giffords
Gingrey (GA)
Gohmert
Goodlatte
Granger
Graves (GA)
Graves (MO)

Grayson
Griffith
Guthrie
Hall (TX)
Harper
Hastings (WA)
Heller
Hensarling
Herger

Hodes
Hoekstra
Hunter
Inglis
Issa
Jenkins
Johnson (IL)
Johnson, Sam
Jones
Jordan (OH)
King (IA)
King (NY)
Kingston
Kirk

Kirkpatrick (AZ)
Kline (MN)
Kratovil
Lamborn
Lance
Latham
LaTourette
Latta
Lee (NY)
Lewis (CA)
Linder

Lipinski
LoBiondo
Lucas
Luetkemeyer
Lummis
Lungren, Daniel E.
Mack
Manzullo
Marchant

Markey (CO)
McCarthy (CA)
McCaul
McClintock
McCotter
McHenry

McIntyre
McKeon
McMorris Rodgers

McNerney
Mica
Miller (FL)
Miller (MI)
Miller, Gary
Minnick
Mitchell
Moran (KS)
Murphy, Tim
Myrick
Neugebauer
Nunes

Nye
Olson
Paul
Paulsen
Pence

Perriello
Petri
Pitts
Platts
Poe (TX)
Posey
Price (GA)
Putnam
Radanovich
Rehberg
Reichert
Roe (TN)
Rogers (AL)
Rogers (KY)
Rogers (MI)
Rohrabacher
Rooney
Ros-Lehtinen
Roskam

Ross
Royce
Ryan (WI)
Scalise
Schmidt
Schock
Sensenbrenner
Sessions
Shadegg
Shimkus
Shuster
Simpson

Skelton
Smith (NE)
Smith (NJ)
Smith (TX)

Space
Stearns
Sullivan

Teague
Terry
Thompson (PA)
Thornberry
Tiahrt
Tiberi

Titus
Turner
Upton
Walden
Westmoreland
Whitfield
Wilson (SC)
Wittman
Wolf
Young (FL)

NAY

Ackerman
Adler (NJ)
Altmire

Andrews
Arcuri
Baca
Baird
Baldwin
Barrow

Bean
Becerra
Berkley
Berman
Berry
Bishop (GA)
Bishop (NY)

Blumenauer
Boccieri
Boren
Boswell
Boyd

Brady (PA)
Braley (IA)
Bright
Brown, Corrine

Butterfield
Capps
Capuano
Cardoza
Carnahan
Carson (IN)
Castor (FL)
Chandler
Chu

Clarke
Clay
Cleaver
Clyburn
Cohen
Connolly (VA)
Conyers
Cooper
Costa
Costello
Courtney
Crowley
Cuellar
Cummings
Dahlkemper
Davis (AL)
Davis (CA)
Davis (IL)
Davis (TN)
DeFazio

DeGette
Delahunt
DeLauro
Deutch
Dicks
Dingell
Doggett
Donnelly (IN)
Doyle
Driehaus
Edwards (MD)

Ellison
Ellsworth
Engel
Eshoo
Etheridge
Farr
Fattah
Filner
Foster
Frank (MA)
Fudge
Garamendi

Gonzalez
Gordon (TN)
Green, Al
Green, Gene
Grijalva
Gutierrez
Hall (NY)
Halvorson
Hare
Harman

Hastings (FL)
Heinrich
Herseth Sandlin
Higgins
Hill

Himes
Hinchey
Hinojosa
Hirono
Holden

Holt
Honda
Hoyer
Inslee
Isra-el
Jackson (IL)
Jackson Lee (TX)
Johnson (GA)
Johnson, E. B.
Kagen

Kanjorski
Kaptur
Kennedy
Kildee
Kilpatrick (MI)

Kilroy
Kind
Kissell
Klein (FL)
Kosmas
Kucinich
Langevin

Larsen (WA)
Larson (CT)
Lee (CA)
Levin
Lewis (GA)
Loebsack
Lofgren, Zoe

Lowey
Luján
Lynch
Maffei
Maloney
Markey (MA)
Marshall
Matheson
Matsui
McCarthy (NY)
McCollum
McDermott
McGovern

McMahon
Meek (FL)
Meeks (NY)
Melancon
Michaud
Miller (NC)

Miller, George
Mollohan
Moore (KS)
Moore (WI)
Moran (VA)
Murphy (CT)
Murphy (NY)
Murphy, Patrick
Nadler (NY)

Napolitano
Neal (MA)
Oberstar
Obey
Olver
Ortiz
Owens
Pallone
Pascrell
Pastor (AZ)
Payne
Perlmutter

Peters
Peterson
Pingree (ME)
Polis (CO)

Pomeroy
Price (NC)
Quigley
Rahall
Rangel
Reyes
Richardson
Rodriguez

Rothman (NJ)
Roybal-Allard
Ruppersberger
Rush
Ryan (OH)
Salazar

Sánchez, Linda T.
Sanchez, Loretta
Sarbanes
Schakowsky
Schauer
Schiff
Schrader

Schwartz
Scott (GA)
Scott (VA)
Serrano
Sestak
Shea-Porter
Sherman
Shuler

Sires
Slaughter
Smith (WA)
Snyder
Speier
Spratt
Stark

Stupak
Sutton
Tanner
Thompson (CA)
Thompson (MS)
Tierney
Tonko

Towns
Tsongas
Van Hollen
Velázquez
Visclosky
Walz

Wasserman Schultz
Waters
Watson
Watt
Waxman
Weiner
Welch

Wilson (OH)
Wu
Yarmuth

Not Voting

Bishop (UT)
Taylor
Wamp
Woolsey
Young (AK)

Why Audit The Federal Reserve?

Ron Paul’s legislation is aimed at pulling back the curtain from a secretive and unaccountable Federal Reserve. Congress and the American people have minimal, if any, oversight over trillions of dollars that the Fed controls.

With recent bailouts and spending decisions shining a spotlight on the actions of the Federal Reserve, more and more pressure is bearing down on Congress to take action and demand accountability and transparency.

Auditing the Fed is only the first step towards exposing this antiquated insider-run creature to the powerful forces of free-market competition. Once there are viable alternatives to the monopolistic fiat dollar, the Federal Reserve will have to become honest and transparent if it wants to remain in business.

Introducing HR 1207

Ron Paul introduced bill H.R. 1207 on February 26, 2009 with the following speech to Congress:

Madame Speaker,

I rise to introduce the Federal Reserve Transparency Act. Throughout its nearly 100-year history, the Federal Reserve has presided over the near-complete destruction of the United States dollar. Since 1913 the dollar has lost over 95% of its purchasing power, aided and abetted by the Federal Reserve’s loose monetary policy. How long will we as a Congress stand idly by while hard-working Americans see their savings eaten away by inflation? Only big-spending politicians and politically favored bankers benefit from inflation.

Serious discussion of proposals to oversee the Federal Reserve is long overdue. I have been a longtime proponent of more effective oversight and auditing of the Fed, but I was far from the first Congressman to advocate these types of proposals. Esteemed former members of the Banking Committee such as Chairmen Wright Patman and Henry B. Gonzales were outspoken critics of the Fed and its lack of transparency.

Since its inception, the Federal Reserve has always operated in the shadows, without sufficient scrutiny or oversight of its operations. While the conventional excuse is that this is intended to reduce the Fed’s susceptibility to political pressures, the reality is that the Fed acts as a foil for the government. Whenever you question the Fed about the strength of the dollar, they will refer you to the Treasury, and vice versa. The Federal Reserve has, on the one hand, many of the privileges of government agencies, while retaining benefits of private organizations, such as being insulated from Freedom of Information Act requests.

The Federal Reserve can enter into agreements with foreign central banks and foreign governments, and the GAO is prohibited from auditing or even seeing these agreements. Why should a government-established agency, whose police force has federal law enforcement powers, and whose notes have legal tender status in this country, be allowed to enter into agreements with foreign powers and foreign banking institutions with no oversight? Particularly when hundreds of billions of dollars of currency swaps have been announced and implemented, the Fed’s negotiations with the European Central Bank, the Bank of International Settlements, and other institutions should face increased scrutiny, most especially because of their significant effect on foreign policy. If the State Department were able to do this, it would be characterized as a rogue agency and brought to heel, and if a private individual did this he might face prosecution under the Logan Act, yet the Fed avoids both fates.

More importantly, the Fed’s funding facilities and its agreements with the Treasury should be reviewed. The Treasury’s supplementary financing accounts that fund Fed facilities allow the Treasury to funnel money to Wall Street without GAO or Congressional oversight. Additional funding facilities, such as the Primary Dealer Credit Facility and the Term Securities Lending Facility, allow the Fed to keep financial asset prices artificially inflated and subsidize poorly performing financial firms.

The Federal Reserve Transparency Act would eliminate restrictions on GAO audits of the Federal Reserve and open Fed operations to enhanced scrutiny. We hear officials constantly lauding the benefits of transparency and especially bemoaning the opacity of the Fed, its monetary policy, and its funding facilities. By opening all Fed operations to a GAO audit and calling for such an audit to be completed by the end of 2010, the Federal Reserve Transparency Act would achieve much-needed transparency of the Federal Reserve. I urge my colleagues to support this bill.

HR 1207

This is the bill itself, H.R. 1207:

111th Congress – 1st Session

H.R. 1207

A BILL

To amend title 31, United States Code, to reform the manner in which the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System is audited by the Comptroller General of the United States and the manner in which such audits are reported, and for other purposes.

1. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled,

SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE.
This Act may be cited as the “Federal Reserve Transparency Act of 2009”.

SEC. 2. AUDIT REFORM AND TRANSPARENCY FOR THE BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM.

(a) IN GENERAL. – Subsection (b) of section 714 of title 31, United States Code, is amended by striking all after “shall audit an agency” and inserting a period.

(b) AUDIT. – Section 714 of title 31, United States Code, is amended by adding at the end the following new subsection:

“(e) AUDIT AND REPORT OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM. –

“(1) IN GENERAL. – The audit of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System and the Federal reserve banks under subsection (b) shall be completed before the end of 2010.

“(2) REPORT –

“(A) REQUIRED. – A report on the audit referred to in paragraph (1) shall be submitted by the Comptroller General to the Congress before the end of the 90-day period beginning on the date on which such audit is completed and made available to the Speaker of the House, the majority and minority leaders of the House of Representatives, the majority and minority leaders of the Senate, the Chairman and Ranking Member of the committee and each sub-committee of jurisdiction in the House of Representatives and the Senate, and any other Member of Congress who requests it.

“(B) CONTENTS. – The report under subparagraph (A) shall include a detailed description of the findings and conclusion of the Comptroller General with respect to the audit that is the subject of the report, together with such recommendations for legislative or administrative action as the Comptroller General may determine to be appropriate.”.

Ron Paul’s Quotes on HR 1207

In this speech to Congress, Ron Paul refutes Ben Bernanke’s interpretation of HR 1207, the bill to audit the Federal Reserve, and explains why only an audit will protect the public’s interest.

Date: 7/30/2009

Ron Paul: Mr. Speaker, the big guns have lined up against HR 1207, the bill to audit the Federal Reserve. What is it that they are so concerned about? What information are they hiding from the American people? The screed is: transparency is okay except for those things they don’t want to be transparent.

Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke, argues that HR 1207, the legislation to audit the Federal Reserve, would politicize monetary policy. He claims that monetary policy must remain independent, that is; secret. He ignores history because chairmen of the Federal Reserve in the past, especially when up for reappointment, do their best to accommodate the president with politically driven low interest rates and a bubble economy.

Former Federal Reserve Board Chairman Arthur Burns, when asked about all the inflation he brought about in 1971 before Nixon’s reelection, said that the Fed has to do what the president wants it to do, or it would lose its independence. That about tells you everything.

Not by accident Chairman Burns strongly supported Nixon’s program of wage and price controls the same year, but I guess that’s not political. Is not making secret deals with the likes of Goldman Sachs, international financial institutions, foreign governments and foreign central banks politicizing monetary policy?

Bernanke argues that the knowledge that their discussions and decisions will one day be scrutinized will compromise the freedom of the Open Market Committee to pursue sound policy. If it is sound and honest and serves no special interest, what’s the problem?

He claims that HR 1207 would give power to Congress to affect monetary policy. He dreamt this up to instill fear, an old statist trick to justify government power. HR 1207 does nothing of the sort. He suggested that the day after an FOMC meeting, Congress could send in the GAO to demand an audit of everything said and done. This is hardly the case. The FOMC function under HR 1207 would not change.

The detailed transcripts of the FOMC meetings are released every 5 years, so why would this be so different and what is it that they don’t want the American people to know? Is there something about the transcripts that need to be kept secret, or are the transcripts actually not verbatim?

Fed sycophants argue that an audit would destroy the financial markets’ faith in the Fed. They say this in the midst of the greatest financial crisis in history brought on by none other than the Federal Reserve. In fact, Chairman Bernanke stated on November 14th 2007, “A considerable amount of evidence indicates that Central Bank transparency increases the effectiveness of monetary policy and enhances economic and financial performance”.

They also argue that an audit would hurt the value of the U.S. dollar. In fact, the Fed, in less than a 100 years of its existence, has reduced the value of the 1914 dollar by 96%.

They claim HR 1207 would raise interest rates. How could it? The Fed sets interest rates and the bill doesn’t interfere with monetary policy. Congress would have no say in the matter and besides, Congress likes low interest rates.

It is argued that the Fed wouldn’t be free to raise interest rates if they thought it necessary. But Bernanke has already assured the Congress that rates are going to stay low for the foreseeable future. And again, this bill does nothing to allow Congress to interfere with interest rate setting.

Fed supporters claim that they want to protect the public’s interest with their secrecy. But the banks and Wall Streets are the opponents of HR 1207, and the people are for it. Just who best represents the public’s interest?

The real question is: why are Wall Street and the Fed so hysterically opposed to HR 1207? Just what information are they so anxious to keep secret? Only an audit of the Federal Reserve will answer these questions.

Excerpt from Ron Paul’s 4/22/2009 appearance on Judge Andrew Napolitano’s Freedom Watch:

Ron Paul: After we came back yesterday from our 2-week break, I think have 15 new people signed on and somebody came up to me and says, “I signed on your bill this morning because I went to my town hall meetings, I went four of them and in every meeting people were there and say, “It’s time that we have transparency of the Fed.'”

But I call them the Fourth Branch of government. Some people don’t think of them as part of the government because they’re so secretive. But we created it, we can end it, we take no responsibility to supervise it, and look at what they’re doing. We spend hundreds of billions, but the Fed deals in trillions, and they don’t have any responsibility to tell us about it. So there’s a lot of power there and it deserves looking at.

And I think I have to say Barney Frank has been sympathetic with this. He’s for transparency. He’s not for hard money and the type of monetary policy I’m talking about. He believes that we should have more transparency of the Fed, so whether this bill gets passed or something very similar, the mood in the country is such that not only do they want us to be better in handling the appropriated fund and knowing where these TARP funds went, the American people have awakened to this whole idea of what the Federal Reserve does behind the scenes.

So I’m delighted. I’ve been pushing this monetary issue for more than 30 years believing it was THE significant economic issue of our time, and I think people are starting to realize this and we’re going to keep hearing about it and there’s a good chance that it will eventually make it to the floor.

Excerpt from Ron Paul’s 3/5/2009 appearance on Judge Andrew Napolitano’s Freedom Watch:

Judge Napolitano: Before we switch gears, Congressman Paul, how did Ben Bernanke react to the legislation that you introduced calling for an audit of the Fed. Did he give you a call on the phone?

Ron Paul: Oh yes, he called me, wanted to congratulate me and he wanted to support my bill. You know, interestingly, just recently, I cannot name his name but I was talking to a former member of the Federal Reserve board and told him about the bill and he was friendly enough.

I said, “What do you think of that?” He said, “I think it’s not a very good idea”. And I said, “Do the people at the Federal Reserve ever talk about, are concerned about the dollar”. I said, you know, I’m always talking about the dollar and what this is going to do to the dollar. And I said, “Do they know that all this debt and inflation could hurt the dollar?” He says, “Yes, they do.” He confirmed it. He said, “They absolutely do.” He says, “But they can’t answer your questions in public because it would cause panic.”

Judge Napolitano: This administration came to power and we all knew the words that they used, “hope” and “change”. But one of the words that they really used was “transparency”. I would think the President himself should be in favor of transparency at the Fed if he wants to be ideologically consistent. What are they afraid we will find out, Congressman Paul?

Ron Paul: Well, what they’re going to find out is, that’s the first step. Once we get the audit bill passed and we can reveal what they are doing, I think the next step is to end the Fed. That’s why they don’t want that.

You know, we had some very good comments made by our Senator Bernie Sanders yesterday from Vermont. I talked with him this morning and we’re going to be talking a lot about the need for having transparency.

And I think the mood is right. The mood is right both with the Democrats and the Republicans, because they don’t know exactly what is going on but they know the American people are sick and tired of just throwing money out there, whether it’s to the Treasury and nobody knows where it goes, whether they send it to Iraq and nobody knows where the bundles of money go, or whether the Federal Reserve can create 2 trillion dollars, and they don’t even have to tell us.

As a government all onto itself, it’s bigger than the whole U.S. Congress. They create trillions in a day, you know, in a short period of time, and in the Congress we do talk a little bit when we pass 400 million or 800 million. But the Fed is a much bigger problem.

Excerpt from Ron Paul’s 3/10/2009 interview with Alex Jones:

Alex Jones: Every few weeks they come before the banking committee and you bring up the fact that what they are doing is destroying us. What do we need to do to bring the private Federal Reserve under control?

Ron Paul: Well, there has to be an uprising by the people. There has to be enough people who will demand that their Congressmen respond, and that is building. You know, a year or two ago nobody in Washington even thought about the Federal Reserve. Today there is a lot more thinking going on and a lot more support for our position. So it is growing. And yet, we’re not on the verge of changing it. I have the bill to get rid of the Federal Reserve, that’s the major step and the ultimate step and they’ll probably self-destruct before we actually pass legislation.

But the bill that is more important in the short run is the auditing bill, the 1207 bill, because that means they have to start answering our questions. Today they are protected. They are in total secrecy and they are protected by the law. If 1207 is passed we have an audit and they have to answer the questions. And I figure if we ever get that far and get the exposure and get the transparency that we need, then people will wake up and realize, ‘why do we have them at all?’

Alex Jones: Senator Sanders grilled them, as you know, last week saying that he is supporting 1207 or a version in the Senate because, Bernanke, the private Fed chief just said, “I’m not going to tell you where the money, buddy.” I mean, that’s amazing to see our elected Congress, the most powerful branch of the government according to our founders, being told to kiss off.

Ron Paul: Right, and I know Sanders real well. He was on the banking committee with me before he went into the Senate, and I called him after that, and I believe he has now introduced my version of the transparency bill and I’ve introduced his version. So both bills exist. Mine is a little bit more conclusive, in that it removes the total authority for them to not answer questions. His is specifically designed to answer certain questions and reveal where certain trillion dollars went. They are very similar, but somewhat different in nature, so we both support each other’s bill and they’ve been introduced in both chambers.

Alex Jones: Well, public support for this and the majority of the Congress itself are saying they are angry, they don’t know where the money is and Bloomberg sued to find out and he’s been told No on their foyer. If this gets media attention I can see now way that Congress wouldn’t vote for a proper audit of the private Federal Reserve.

Ron Paul: They’re going to, if we can get it that far. It’s a good issue, like so many of our issues, we bring different many factions together, liberals and conservatives, under the constitution. Because, if you’re a good honest liberal like Bernie Sanders, he is an honest person but is very, very liberal. He calls himself a socialist, but he agrees on the transparency issue.

So this whole idea that we expose them to bring populists, libertarians, constitutionals, liberals, socialist all together and think, “If we can’t do this, what’s left of representative government? There’s nothing left.” So it’s a good unifier, I think it’s a great issue.

Promote Audit the Fed

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  • Robert Holland

    The Federal reserve does not need to be audited, it needs to be removed and all the ill gotten gains they have stolen from the American people returned ten fold. The federal reserve act is the greatest act of treason ever committed against the constitution and the American people. Congress committed treason when they put their names to it and Woodrow Wilson betrayed all of America when he let them black mail him into signing it into power. These people are thieves, murders and traitors they are worse than any of the criminals in our history and need to be dealt with as such. Its WE THE PEOPLE, not we the government. Americans need to get off their lazy asses and read the constitution for once in their lives. Our Constitution should be taught to our children from the time they can read to the time they graduate. There’s no excuse for any American not to know their constitution by heart, Its what protects our rights and freedoms from these traitors, which is why government sought to control our children’s education. and put this military flag in our children’s class rooms to get them used to military rule which is where we have been since the seventies when congress passed thousands of laws designed to render the constitution useless. In the seventies on KTLA channel 9 out of Los Angelus Ca. one former Congressman, a standing Congressman and a Senator went live on National television and begged the American people to call there representatives and stop them from passing these laws, their words went unheard. Read your constitution no where in it does government have a right to control education the federal government uses our tax dollars to fund education their way.

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  • Robert Holland

    Why as Americans are we not hanging these traitors by
    the neck until dead

    WHERE THE HELL IS OUR AMERICAN FLAG AND WHY IS THIS
    FLAG UNITED STATES ARMY CODE OF REGULATIONS 270-10 THE YELLOW FRINGE FLAG
    OTHERWISE KNOWN AS THE FLAG OF ADMIRALITY IN OUR, THE PEOPLES COURT ROOMS,
    POLICE DEPARTMENTS, FIRE HOUSES AND EVEN IN OUR CHILDRENS CLASS ROOMS.

    THIS IS NOT THE FLAG I PLEDGED MY ALLEGIANCE TO NOR IS
    IT THE FLAG I WILL EVER PLEAD MY GUILT OR INNOCENCE BEFORE. THIS FLAG HAS NO PLACE IN THESE ENVIRONMENTS. THESE ARE NOT MILITARY ESTABLISHMENTS AND
    THEY DO NOT HAVE A RIGHT TO OPERATE UNDER MILITARY AUTHORITY. IT IS TRESON TO WRITE LAW THAT SUPERCEDES THE
    SUPREME LAW OF THE LAND OUR CONSTITUTION, AND THIS IS TREASON. THIS IS NOTHING
    LESS THAN A DECLARATION OF WAR BY OUR OWN GOVERNMENT, AGAINST THE AMERICAN
    PEOPLE AND THEIR RIGHTS AND FREEDOMS AS PROMISED AND GAURANTEED UNDER THE
    CONSTITUTION. OUR CONSTITUTION WAS
    WRITTEN IN PLAIN SIMPLE ENGLISH SO THAT THE SIMPLIST OF AMERICANS COULD
    UNDERSTAND ITS TRUE MEANING. MAYBE WE
    SHOULD REPLACE, THESE FUCKING MORONS IN THE SUPREME COURT, WITH SIMPLE MINDED
    AMERICANS, MAYBE THEN THINGS WILL BE DONE RIGHT.

    This is exactly why we have our second amendment right
    to bear arms, to protect the freedom of state from those who would betray us.
    Ignorance of the law is no excuse

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    • Naomi

      WELL SAID!

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  • Alan Sabath

    you should know about stealing your a big fucking crook yourself so is your son you phony hyrocrite

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