Education

776 Responses




Ron Paul works towards the elimination of the inefficient Department of Education, leaving education decisions to be made at the state, local or personal level. Parents should have the right to spend their money on the school or method of schooling they deem appropriate for their children.

On November 14, 2008 Ron Paul said in a New York Times interview:

“First, the Constitution does not authorize the Department of Education, and the founders never envisioned the federal government dictating those education policies.

Second, it is a huge bureaucracy that squanders our money. We send billions of dollars to Washington and get back less than we sent. The money would be much better off left in states and local communities rather than being squandered in Washington.

Finally, I think that the smallest level of government possible best performs education. Teachers, parents, and local community leaders should be making decisions about exactly how our children should be taught, not Washington bureaucrats.

The Department of Education has given us No Child Left Behind, massive unfunded mandates, indoctrination, and in some cases, forced medication of our children with psychotropic drugs. We should get rid of all of that and get those choices back in the hands of the people.”

Note: This summary of Ron Paul’s position has been determined to be incomplete! Contact us to join RonPaul.com as a voluntary editor. Help us set the record straight and keep this page up-to-date.

776 responses to “Education”

  1. Jeremy

    RON PAUL YEAHHHHHHHHHHHHHH!!!!!!!!

    »crosslinked«

    Report this comment

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 2 Thumb down 0

    1. edna

      With Ron Paul’s policies the rich kids will do fine!

      Report this comment

      Like or Dislike: Thumb up 3 Thumb down 8

  2. longshotlouie

    Technological Demonizing
    http://www.wnd.com/index.php?fa=PAGE.view&pageId=110010

    Report this comment

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 0

    1. Janice

      Where’s Your Homework, Mr. President?

      Greg Palast gets a lesson from super-teacher Bill Roney. Listen to the podcast on ActionPoint radio.

      Monday, September 7, 2009

      While I’m disturbed that Obama has adopted George Bush’s war on Afghanistan, Super-teacher Roney is concerned that Obama has, weirdly, inexplicably, adopted Bush’s war on educators, a program best described as No Child’s Behind Left.

      Roney has taken a heavy red pencil to the President’s Bush-Lite program, and found five big fat errors that need correcting:

      to read the 5 things that need correcting……..
      http://www.gregpalast.com/wheres-your-homework-mr-president/#more-2785

      Report this comment

      Like or Dislike: Thumb up 2 Thumb down 0

  3. longshotlouie

    50 page introduction to the 150th anniversary edition of ‘Origin of Species’.

    (Unless otherwise indicated, Scripture quotations in this book are from the King James Version of the Bible)
    http://assets.livingwaters.com/pdf/OriginofSpecies.pdf

    Report this comment

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 3 Thumb down 0

  4. christine

    The Rockefellers established the Dept. of Education. That ought to tell you something right there. They control what is taught. That’s why we know little about money, our true American history including our mistakes, …they want us to be happy to be just serfs, serving the elite.

    Report this comment

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 6 Thumb down 0

  5. Alan Cherne

    Research Charlotte Iserbyt and the Deliberate Dumbing Down of America, it exposes how our education system is nothing more than state imposed brainwashing.

    Report this comment

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 5 Thumb down 1

  6. Evergreen2U

    Does anyone disagree that an educated and healthy people make for a strong economy and nation?

    If only the rich are educated and healthy we create an increasingly stratified and consequently weakened society. Stratified societies also tend to become unstable through time if history is any help at all.

    Public education ensures a base line education for all. A Public Health option ensures baseline health for all. Both are part of the commons like roads and air and water. They are NECESSARY to promote the general welfare. They aren’t regional necessities; they are the necessities of a nation and require some homogenity to be of full use.

    No institution, be it government or privately run entity (or no one human for that matter) is ever perfect …but I guarantee it is going to get worse as we are now running out of resources at the same time we are increasing pollution and people and haven’t found the sustainable path for our little spaceship earth (yet?).

    We can each say “I’ve got mine, the hell with you” or we can say, “united we stand, divided we fall”. As onward through the carbon haze we trudge.

    Report this comment

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 5 Thumb down 2

  7. Richard

    Schools should be run like a business. When I get a bad product I bring it back. We erronously accept the presentation of knowledge by the school systems as being adequate for all. It is not. When a consumer thinks they are not getting what they wanted for the money they provided they can try another presentation of the product. The products can be sold at little stores. I am tired of this system! No child left behind, utter BS.

    Report this comment

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 0

  8. christine

    In order to disolve and then create a system “we the people” would agree to, with our morals, values and priciples as human beings to human beings, we have to get at the root of the problem.

    The elitists, the bankers, control our educational system and have for many years. That’s the foundation upon which America has built the educational system. With that in mind, we can more easily see the corruption in our educational system. If the foundation is bad, all else that is built on top of it will not, and could not be good, nor what we want. We see it clearly in our financial system. Same deal in the educational system.

    The Rockefellers founded the Department of Education!

    It was designed to control what the people in America learn. Many acknowledge that the education is not designed to be at our best or to know the truth. Our American history, for example, is distorted into what they would like us to believe, but is not so. We are then unprepared to properly understand our politics of today. This system, from the foundation guidelines set by the Rockefellers needs to be revamped by sincere and honest folks who are free from this bias. Then, and only then, I believe we could build a great educational system from ground on up that serves all of us well.

    Report this comment

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 4 Thumb down 0

    1. kitty

      Exactly! Thank you – anyone who doubts this, PLEASE read John Taylor Gatto, I would also recommend reading the Constitution, and the Amendments. Which are difficult to obtain in original wording, without paying a fee – what does that say?

      Report this comment

      Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

  9. Jan

    Government is in the dumming down business not educating.
    Government is into creating joblessness not educating.
    Government is into destroying the youths minds and their morals not educating……
    Government took prayer out of schools and made God bad.
    Government wants to destroy your mind, and see you waste it, not to raise YOU up to a higher level.
    Government is into to mind control not freedom to think and to speak out about what you think……government wants to rule your mind, not to free it…….to invent or to create.
    Government wants you worshipping idols and to distort your thinking with sex and drugs.
    Money is their game……not your education…..

    The Illuminati Tsunami is fast approaching and nearly at our doorsteps, but I still stand on dry ground for which my Lord has parted the sea for me to walk in……….my eyes are on the sparrow and my heart is with the Spirit of the Lord!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    forever Jan in Christ!

    Report this comment

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 3

  10. Never Forget
  11. VR
  12. Eric

    I see little difference in funding or running education at the state/local level except that most people don’t know as much about their local governments and local policies.

    When you leave decisions to the local level you get school boards approving science curriculum about Eve petting dinosaurs in the Garden of Eden and Sex Ed material about the dangers of condoms. Because national news outlets don’t really cover (‘insert you’re county here’).

    But heres something that might work well at a local level.

    A solution to our education system. Imagine for a moment, a 14 year old, who knows as much about any school subject as most 14 year olds do about The World of Warcraft (WoW).

    Computer/Video gaming as an educational medium was tried by a few gaming companies, and was quite successful. However gaming was still seen by the industry in general as entirely entertainment. Why? Because because thats how they sell games.

    Edugaming failed because
    1 the gaming technology available at the time was very limited. Making games was more about working with what you could make.
    2 Edugames weren’t mainstream, and since nobody got their allowance for winning ‘Castle of Dr.Brain’. Super Mario Bros made the Christmas list and Edutainment did not.
    3 Due to the limited technology, Edugaming was limited to essentially testing a players knowledge of a subject. Gameing tech just didn’t have the versatility to actually teach much of anything.

    In spite of its limited application edugames were highly effective in teaching their subjects. Players actually asked their parents or teachers what they needed to continue their games and retained it.

    If local schools bought games which taught the various subjects in a manor applicable to a curriculum based school environment, then the gaming industry would be clamoring to make the best, most immersive and educational games with the best built in teacher and faculty support possible. Industry games would attempt teach subjects as widely as possible, trying to find any niche of learning that could be more easily and more thoroughly taught through games.

    Entertainment is absorbed into the brain much faster than you can cram it down anyones throat from a whiteboard.

    If the gaming industry can market to a 9 year old the absolute importance of whether L3 Intellect buff increases critical strike chance on certain spells more then a charm with a greater Intellect bonus, based on the order said values are calculated, then just how hard would it be for a gaming industry to teach kids how to find the Least Common Denominator?

    That was a long sentence. It would have been so much longer if I had explained a more typical scenario in many popular MMORPGs.

    To put this into perspective, as I type this there are thousands of children who have not yet covered order of operations in math class who are currently disobeying their parents and comparing WoW items on WoWhead.com.

    They are using a limited prerequisite knowledge of the order of operations to even be able to calculate the benefits of various stat bonuses. With the reluctant help of friends they are working with concepts that haven’t been introduced in their math class. Unfortunately this probably won’t raise their grades much because WoW only requires some of the math.

    Unfortunately math is the only subject even touched by any games, with the exception some history in various WWII games or civilization builders for example. But thats kinda like learning from movies, the accuracy isn’t all that great when the only purpose is fun. Besides, steampunk is is taking over and putting historical games in a fantasy world.

    What keeps Edutainment from becoming the standard of education?
    It’s not the tech
    It’s not the versatility of the mediums
    It’s because we expect schools to teach our kids with the same system that was used in ancient Babylon in the Copper age so we can continue our adult lives.

    They used chalk and a slate, we use pen and paper. They used scrolls, we use books. They used a 16″ leather strap, we deduct from their allowances. They had 4 to 6 students to a teacher, we have 30 to 40 students to a teacher.

    All the information tech has changed and grown, from pigeons and papyrus to the internet cell phone and documentaries. Schools have slowly incorporated some of this informations tech, but the teaching itself has remained the same.

    Report this comment

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 2

  13. Lindsay

    As a teacher, in my opinion, No Child Left Behind has done horrible things to education. It has caused teachers to simply ‘teach to the test.’ For many teachers, this means dumbing down the curriculum, not being able to actively engage our students or promote critical thinking skills, teaching to tests rather than real world applications, and in Arkansas, Kindergarteners who are scared to death because AR thought it was a good idea to go ahead and start testing them in K. Now, great teachers still find time and energy to accomplish all of these things. But, it is tough. NCLB has not done what it was supposed to. I understand that we need accountability. There are some teachers out there who don’t have the drive to accomplish the goals every day on their own. Fire them. But, we should not punish our children. And, that is what NCLB has done in my opinion. Young children learn through hands on activities, being actively engaged in their own learning, through play, and through real world applications. NCLB takes that away from many teachers because they are so worried about their kids passing this test (because they are afraid that they will lose their job), that they spend their time teaching to the test.

    Report this comment

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 2 Thumb down 0

  14. Christine

    You know how they build a Home Depot store in Chicago, IL that is exactly the same as the store in Seattle, WA…. so that when I travel to IL and go into the store, I know right where to find the item I’m looking for…..Do that for schools! Each state is responsible for overseeing that the work gets done. Change the way education is paid for, not by local taxpayers of each school because that varies too much per population areas. This shouldn’t be that difficult. If Home Depot, Wal-mart, K-Mart, Safeway, Albertsons, Lowes, etc. can do it, so can the states concerning schools. Education needs to be back on top of the list of American priorities!

    Stop spending money making enemies around the world and take care of our business at home! It’s our money and we want it spent here in USA.

    Report this comment

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 0

  15. Tamara

    As a professor, the “No child left behind” act has in reality harmed the students and the population in general. The level of reading, writing, and mathematical ability has declined considerably. The majority of the students that are being taught in private and community colleges really should have never graduated from high school as they are lacking key skills. And, some colleges urge the professors to pass the students so they can continue to receive funding. This only leads to an increasing population of idiots entering the workforce. And we wonder why this country has gone down hill.

    Report this comment

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 0

    1. ant

      kids who goes to private schools are better equipped study shows

      Report this comment

      Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

  16. Nelly

    My problem with privatizing schools is that while it may improve schools, give kids that individual attention they need and have actual teaching going on, there will likely be a whole segment of the country (those families living on around $40,000 or less a year) who simply won’t have the ability to send their children to school. Even if competition between school drive prices down to really cheap, it won’t matter. Even if school cost around $1000 to $2000 a year (which is cheap for a private school), if a family is barely putting food on the table then they are not very likely spend that kind of money on sending their child to school. Or maybe if they have 2 or 3 children, they will chose only to send 1. Another problem I can see happening is what if we run into another recession or economic downturn; people lose their job, start having trouble with their mortgage, start facing foreclosure and suddenly they can’t pay for little Suzie’s education or have to send her to a different, less costly school. Free public education give parents a certainty that no matter what happens to them, whether they lose their job, have some costly medical problem, death in the family, etc. that their children will always have an education.
    I would actually prefer that instead of a fully private or fully public school that we have something in between (semi-private). Where parents have to pay a certain amount (depending on their income) to the school that is educating their children. This would help lower taxes because parents will carry most of the cost of education rather than taxpayers. This would give schools an incentive for improving because they would want to attract parents (especially parents with higher income). This would also facilitate parental involvement because parents would want to get their money’s worth of the education that they are paying for. As far as national tax dollars, schools and states can decided if they want to meet national education standards are not; with the money from parents and state and local taxes they shouldn’t need fedeal money, but a federal guideline should at least be established to give a benchmark. Or even just national test for select grades that can be used across the country to judge where your child places nationally. This would let parents know if their school is teching their child adequately.

    Report this comment

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

    1. kitty

      Parents already pay for schools through taxes. The government uses the funds unwisely, would it not be better to spend our school tax dollars how we see fit on our own? My school taxes are higher than the cost of homeschooling and equal to the cost of private schools in my area, yet I still have to pay them AND the costs of other methods of schooling if I choose them.

      Report this comment

      Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

      1. Nelly

        I know parents pay for school through taxes but I’m talking about a more direct way -money for a specific school, for your individual child. Not the mass allocation of funds that filtered through the education system (like with taxes). That way the money would be more transparent and parents can decided which public school (if any) would get their money. Also parents who want to home school or send their kids to private schools obviously wont pay. Though they still will have to pay a small tax for local schools -children are the future of our country and everyone benefits when ppl invest in their education. Thats my proposal.

        Report this comment

        Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

        1. kitty

          I like your ides, but doubt they would work in the real world, too many would get caught up in the fight over who pays what and why, and they would all have valid arguments. Maybe it would work on a local level in some areas.

          I definitely agree that children are our future and education is important, but education is not the same as school. I agree with RP on this one, keep the schools local and make local decisions regarding the children in our communities. One thing lacking is not just responsibility on the part of parents, but of communities as a whole. If we had to make these decisions on a local level, we would care more, know our neighbors more, and be more involved in education as a whole. Yes there would be those who refused to do so, but there are more now who just do not invest because it is another’s job to care.

          Report this comment

          Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

    2. dan

      Hi Nelly, there actually IS a good solution to the school system: ALL schools should be private, but if a family cannot pay for their kids’ education, then the government will pay the tuition. That increases competition so if your kids are doing well in a private school where the government is paying the tuition (and of course other kids in the school are having their parents pay for it, depending on income), if your kids are doing very well, getting good grades and all, the government could put your kids in a highly-rated private school at no cost.

      Report this comment

      Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

  17. Jan

    Here’s one way to free us……
    Ayn Rand’s essay “Government Financing in a Free Society” published in The Virtue of Selfishness
    Taxation would be replaced with voluntary financing methods under capitalism
    How is government supported under capitalism?

    A government is supported under capitalism through voluntary financing methods.

    How will one support government without taxation?

    The removal of all taxation would be the last step to implement in the transition to a free capitalist society. The costs of a proper government — with an army (engaged only in self-defense and not imperialism), a court system, and a police force — are very small, and easily paid for by voluntary financing methods. Such methods are used by nonprofit agencies, like churches, to raise billions of dollars. Observe how one “know nothing capitalist” Ted Turner recently gave a billion dollars to a useless, anti-capitalist organization like the United Nations.
    Why would voluntary methods fail to work under our present system?

    Only if one wants to turn government into an engine of the welfare state/new world-order (‘one country, with one big leash tied around its neck’, with the untouchable bureaucrats of the ‘United Nations’ holding the leash), do voluntary methods fail to work.

    Most people (not all) would voluntarily give 5 or 10% of their income to support a government that protects rights; practically no one would give 50% to 90% of their income to support a mixed economy/welfare state, which is why the government uses lethal force to physically take it away from you.

    Who would want to voluntarily pay for that? Perhaps a few people would, but they are the ones who think that they will get to hold onto the leash.

    http://www.capitalism.org/faq/taxation.htm

    take the tour of Capitalism.org………
    http://www.capitalism.org/tour/

    Report this comment

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 0

  18. Ryan J

    There should not be tax dollars for schools. Schools should also not be run by the government (inefficient). Couple’s who decide to have children should simply pay for their child’s education. It’s the most fair and each school should be privately run.

    Report this comment

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 1

    1. James

      What an idiotic statement. Don’t educate the poor, then wonder why they stay poor. Then you’ll complain about increased crime and welfare, DUH!

      Raising academic standards and holding students accountable for reaching them before moving to the next class would be much better than the current system. Claifornia tried an exit exam, more minorities failed = unconstitutional = no student accountability. Also implementing tracking similar to every other industrialized country would be much more efficient. Some students aren’t going to be doctors, let them learn a trade in HS instead of dumbing down chemistry so everyone can pass.

      Report this comment

      Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

    2. kitty

      James,

      You are correct in saying that crime and welfare are a result of education, but incorrect in assuming that public school educates.

      Many of the best minds in our country now and in our past are dropouts, self educated. School took away the right of a child to properly learn a trade through apprenticeship, which would qualify as education. It corrupts our desire to learn by making the process unduly difficult. Try looking at documented literacy rates from military rejects in the wars of the past century, you will find that as public schooling increases – literacy DROPS.

      Report this comment

      Like or Dislike: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 0

  19. Rick G.

    It is possible to acquire a HS diploma online, and many home school organizations have come together to have their states recognize home school education. Here are a couple of links.
    http://www.hslda.org/highschool/diploma.asp
    http://www.home-school.com/Articles/HomeschoolDiplomas.html

    Report this comment

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

  20. internet high school diploma at home

    It is possible to acquire high school diploma online through accredited home schooling

    Report this comment

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

  21. John

    during my time in the educational system i think back on it as a period of time in which i felt repressed and chided. I was used as a state aid case for “special kids” because i was uncooperative and “distracted”. Around 8th grade i started to move my self from a special needs case having realized i had been taught the same thing year after year. It stunted i feel an important moment in my life.

    Report this comment

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

  22. we the people

    guys we need to stay focused, our main priority should be to ensure that the fed is audited. just today i sent the fax sheet for H R 1207 to every representative and senator in NY and NJ. I live in the Bronx and i can assure the moment i tell someone auditing the federal reserve they are immediately interested. we have to stay on course and let as many people as possible know about the fed. i came across a website call warnthepeople.org and they use a series of videos to enlighten people on bankers agenda.
    along with a flier we should also refer people to sites like this for more information on the fed for it will save us from having to print all the info. again stay focused we need 2/3 of the house and senate to co-sponsor this bill. and ultimately its up to us whether we succeed or not.

    ps if you guys have any creative ideas on how to spread the word and bring more people to our cause please post.

    Report this comment

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

  23. ant

    and click on (stupid in america)

    Report this comment

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

  24. ant

    in the us privatising schools are the best way to go .competition of schools would make schools better and cheaper.

    go on youtube put in /john stossel privatising schools/ and learn about it

    Report this comment

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

    1. Nelly

      I agree that privatizing schools would make some schools better. But I’m sure there will be plenty of schools that will decide, since they wouldn’t be getting government funding, that they will be middle-performing schools that will target middle and poor income families who can not afford expensive high performing schools. Privatizing education will only create a system where the rich can send their kids to the best schools, with the best highly paid teachers, best activities and cutting edge programs while everyone else falls in line along their social-economic standings. My parents were not rich, but I got to go to a nice school because of the area we were in. If schools were privatized, it is likely that my parents could afford to send me, my brother and my sister to such good schools. Take it from someone who just left public school, the problem isn’t with funding, teachers or administration (though they can all take some blame) the main problem is that half of the kids in public schools act like animals. These kids are not thought how to behave in school and it is the problem of bad parenting.

      Report this comment

      Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

      1. ant

        through competition there will be cheaper schools

        Report this comment

        Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

  25. Be Real

    I see the basic premise for Dr. Paul’s position on Education. What it doesn’t explain is how there will be parity in the educational level received from state to state. Picture a system where a child from Alabama could never aspire to go to a New York school because the system he is in is inherently inferior?

    The system now is broken but to leave this up individual states would be a mistake because we are one country and the education needs to have barometer that crosses borders.

    Report this comment

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 0

    1. RonnieP

      Leaving education to be run by educators and the community makes more sense that a federal mandate. Our daughter attends an independent (private) school and her experiences has been phenomenal. She went to public school for two years and was left to fall through the cracks in an over-populated classroom (just like all others.) Now, she benefits from small class sizes, individualized learning plans, foreign language immersion, theater, art and music programs, technology classes- I could could go on and on. There is no reason the public schools could not provide the same if they were not crushed by bureaucracy, meaningless standardized tests, and crowded classrooms. Bill Gates as some interesting ideas- he understands that we are preparing our children for jobs that don’t even exist yet. The days of sitting at a desk all day and then spitting back what you’ve learned on a test are over. Interactive learning, learning to be a creative thinker with creative ideas and solutions- that is what we need in every school today.

      Report this comment

      Like or Dislike: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 0

  26. Ryan Twedt

    Dr. Paul I agree with everything that you have about Government spending except on this one. You off all people know what Education can do for someone. It enlightens them in some degree. Allows life to be a little more brighter and easier to see. Knowledge and truth become common ground. Education for people, is like water for plants. Human beings are the BEST investment that this Earth has produced. We are just really confused right now. Mr. Paul, I didn’t even know how our Government was even structured like, let alone learn the constitution, until I was paying $3,500 a semester plus books while making $8.65 as an underpaid Computer Tech at a local Office Supply Store. Granted they raised the minimum wage and washed out all the growth I made, on income ladder, out from underneath me. Everything else went up in cost and guess what they didn’t raise my pay.
    Grants and Harsh Student loans needs money and pay more to teachers. Honestly, I wouldn’t have gone to college if I didn’t find a company to pay for it. Thank you Qwest! I support Ron Paul!
    Vote Ron Paul 2012!!!!!

    Report this comment

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 0

    1. One Way

      I’m sure RP agrees with you that education is important and valuable. However, that doesn’t mean that education has to be instituted at the federal level. It can be run privately (like most colleges and universities), or at the state level. And, research shows that the number one most effective place to learn is in the home. Not that home should be the only place that children learn, but parents’ involvement in educating their children through every day situations is priceless.

      Report this comment

      Like or Dislike: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 1

      1. ant

        private schooling is better than state schooling

        state schooling is just like federal schooling

        Report this comment

        Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

      2. Rachel

        As a teacher I hate the idea of private schools. Privatization of schooling means that the rich get good educations while the poor are reduced to either no education or a far worse education. Education in this country is supposed to be the great equalizer. The American dream is that we can rise above our circumstances. We are not a caste system where you are forced to remain in the economic class you were born into. However privatization of schools would create just that. It says if you’re poor you are unworthy of a good education and therefore shouldn’t even worry about college or rising from your poverty. Yes the department of education is messed up but to go strictly to private schools would create an America that I would not want to live or teach in.

        Report this comment

        Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

    2. One Way

      I’m sure RP agrees with you that education is necessary and valuable. However, that does not mean that education should be instituted at the federal level. It can be run privately, semi-privately (like most colleges and universities, or at the state level. There are lots of options.

      Developmental research shows that the home is the best place to get the most education. Not that children should only learn in the home, but parents’ involvement in teaching their children through every day situations is priceless.

      Report this comment

      Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

  27. Kevin Klebba DDS MD

    The process of receiving an education ( whether grammar, high school ,vocational ,or college ) can be broken down as 1)dispensing of information , 2) assimilation and mastery of information , and 3) certification of the mastery of information. With these assumptions of the education process it is despicable for our traditional education systems to spend the money they do in achieving their results. How can we justify a nearly 10 to 20 fold increase in the cost of college tuition in the last 25 years when the most widely utilized form of information dispensation has been reduced by 10 fold. Yes , I am referring to the cost of the personal computer. In 1985 a personal computer cost $5000.00 . Today , a personal computer which is more powerful and sophisticated will cost roughly $ 500.00 to $ 600.00 . Many universities will depend on use of personal computers and internet for much of their curriculum to be tought. I was recently informed that Wayne State University’s medical school provides their first 2 years of basic science curriculum thru internet utilization in addition to live classes. ( Why not scrap the physical presence in class altogether) This is a cost effective and efficient way for students to learn basic medical sciences in a discipline based (mastery)fashion. If it can be done at the professional level than it can be implemented at all levels to some degree. I call attention to this because we have a true crisis in our education system at all levels where costs have escalated unchecked. The question for all government officials is : why have college tuition costs risen so dramatically in the face of a dramatically inexpensive delivery sytem. The answer of course is : BECAUSE THEY CAN ! The creation of easy financing credit in the form of government backed student loans, entitlements , grants, and endowments have created a system where NOBODY has to say the word NO and instead of walking away from a school with an unrealistic cost, the government backed credit system is employed and a true market cost is never realized until it is too late . ( $100,000 to $200,000 later) This tuition cost crisis needs to be investigated not to spend more money on college as the Obama administration wants to but rather to spend less by encouraging students, parents, and eventually all educational systems to realize that it is not the money spent on an education or tuition but rather the time spent in the discipline. (I encourage President Obama and congress to ask of the education lobby sucklings: why are your tuition rates so high ? Is there not a way you can reduce your costs without siphoning off more federal dollars , grants , or loans.) Yes we still need teachers and professors and we need to pay them well , however, their salaries have not risen 10-25 fold either in the last 25 years. Most money spent in educational systems is spent on physical structure not on teachers or professors and when certain volumes of information can be dispensed thru a more efficient manner the cost should de-escalate .

    Report this comment

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 0

    1. One Way

      Absolutely!

      Report this comment

      Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

  28. Zach

    Nelly wrote:

    “I can tell you that when public schools are ran correctly that can change a society”

    Thats the exact problem. A federally run school will never be run correctly. That exactly why states should be taking care of them WITHOUT federal nannying.

    Personally I believe in a school voucher type system. it creates an incentive system for teachers and administrators. School not doing so hot? well there goes some funds. School doing well? pay increase! unfortunately this also Necessitates parental involvement in the schooling of their children, which as most know is not exactly a priority of a lot of parents (partiularly inner city ones)

    Report this comment

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

    1. Mike

      My biggest reason for wanting the schools run at a state level would be this very fact of inner city schools that recieve much more funding every year than a school like where I went. I lived in a rural community where we had a fraction of the tax payers and still had a nice school because of fund raisers and, yes, even people from the community coming out to do work on the school! My high school baseball coach built our field from the ground up. He recieved little monetary help from the school and our field is recognized as one of the nicest in the state. Then, inner city schools come out and play us on our field and go home and wine about how they don’t have as nice of things. People need to get the sense of community back instead of asking for government handouts which are innefficient and support a BS program.

      Report this comment

      Like or Dislike: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 0

      1. Zack

        The same thing happens at my school we have an artificial turf field and one of the nicest tracks in the State. So of course when other teams play us they complain yet guess who paid for the field. Yes it’s people in the community and local businesses. I agree 100% with you because also right now at my school I am trying to lower the outrageous lunch prices (3.00 for one slice of pizza) through of course the school PTSA a bunch of people trying to improve the school.

        Report this comment

        Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

  29. Chris

    I do not think you will find Ron paul claiming that ALL public schools are bad. There are cases of everything, its up to the individuel. By eliminating standard framesets you create more space for these individuals to evolve.

    Report this comment

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 0

  30. One Way

    I agree that most of the problems with public schools is bad parenting. The problem with public education is a social problem. For education to improve, society has to improve. It won’t help to “improve” programs, funding, testing, standards, teachers’ salaries, etc. But, I think that’s RP’s point. If we eliminate a dependency on federal education, individuals, parents, families, and communities will have to become self-sufficient. People will be forced to pursue greatness in education for their own reasons: to solve problems in their communities, to be financially stable, to achieve personal success, etc. Then everyone who enters a school, teachers and students, will be there to accomplish their own goals, and will participate enthusiastically.

    However, as great as that would be, I do worry about how to pull out of the bottomless pit we are in with education now. If we suddenly shut down the current, failed system, we may just make things worse in the short run, and we need to be prepared with a response to that.

    Report this comment

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 0

  31. Nelly

    I know for a fact that the public school system can work -I’m a proud 2008 graduate of Montgomery County Public Schools – but I think the biggest problem it has is that for it to succeed it would take more effort than most students, parents, teachers, school administrators and politicians are willing to put in. One of the biggest problems is with students and parents right now. There are so many parents who are not raising their children and many capable teachers are now reduced to glorified babysitters and many schools are now daycares. I know this for a fact as I just left high school last year. I mostly took AP and honors classes so most of my classmates where rarely disrespectful but I took a SAT Prep class in my junior year and it was mostly filled with the students who took regular level classes and they were the rudest kids I have ever seen. They were so bad that the teacher ended up in tears several times and usually had to call security in about once a week because of problem students – and this was only a 45 min class. There were many days were I learned nothing in that class because the kids were so disrespectful that teacher couldn’t teach. It wasn’t the teachers fault because I also had her for AP English were she was brilliant and I learned a lot; in there our class participated in brilliant discussions, did several 7-10 page papers per semester, read at least 7 books per semester (with accompanying test and essays) and I got a 5 on my AP exam. It was one of my favorite classes in my whole high school experience. So before politicians and other start critiquing the schools and the teachers, most of what is wrong with our school system is down to bad parenting.

    Report this comment

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 2 Thumb down 0

    1. Randy

      I wish I could agree with you Nelly but I have to agree with Ron Paul on this one. Did you know that honors and AP classes are currently under assault and may eventually be removed in California? People argue that the best teachers tend to teach those classes which makes normal classes even worse. Although there is certainly some truth to that, it would be a continuation of the effort to lower the bar to a point where everyone can “feel good”. Forcing someone who isn’t very good at math and hates the subject to learn the same material at the same pace as a talented math student who is eager to learn is shear lunacy. That is the type of nonsense that public schools have given us and there is no sign of them changing directions.

      Private schools consistently produce better students and, on average, actually cost LESS than public schools. Check out http://www.cato.org/pubs/briefs/bp-025.html or any other source on the subject if you don’t care for the CATO institute.

      Report this comment

      Like or Dislike: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 0

  32. Cathy

    I agree with Ron Paul. I’ve worked in higher ed for over a decade and watched with dismay as the quality of students has declined. I think most American parents would be shocked if they sat with a group of students from a typical college and discussed such basics as history, geography and mathematics. If they read student’s papers, they would be horrified at the level of writing.

    I don’t know what exactly is the problem, I just know that our K-12 system is failing to prepare our children to do college-level work.

    Report this comment

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 0

    1. Fred

      More people are going into higher ed now than in the past and intelligence is a relatively stable attribute within populations. Therefore, you are more likely to run into students who just don’t seem to have what it takes. Also, there is so much more to learn today for example history…how many years since you were in high school…think of all that has happened since then and where it fits in with a current affairs course. Also, in the realm of science…cloning and stem cells for example.

      Report this comment

      Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

  33. Aaron

    No Child Left Behind is atrocious. My daughter went to a school under this terrible plan for 2 years. She now goes to a private school. The difference in homework, class size, and general attitude of the school were completely different. If I hadn’t personally pushed my child to excel at reading and math she wouldn’t have been able to assimilate into the private school well at all. Not only that, but the other kids picked on my daughter because she was too advanced. Which discouraged her to perform well or even behave well.

    Standardizing school programs nationally is a mistake. It eliminates competition between schools which eliminates the cultivation of educational programs that exceed “the norm”. I don’t want my daughter to be held back by national standards. I want her to know success through her drive and ability.

    Report this comment

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

    1. Gen

      Sorry, there is competition in public schools. It is a problem. Schools get money for higher scores in their minority populations, having an advisory, having smaller learning communities, winning sports teams (in TX – yes it’s there, the funds hide), for # of students taking AP tests (not # who pass them), and extra for special ed students. It puts a lot of pressure on kids and creates a lot of useless admin positions. So even though a school will say “we spend X dollars per student”, you never really know how much benefits students. Going after the almighty dollar causes a lot of good teachers to be sacrificed and used as scapegoats.

      Trust me, as it stands, I do not want my kids in public school in the “good” school district I teach in. They do not fall into any special categories such as the aforementioned. They both have a high propensity for learning. I suspect the oldest may even been at genius level: he does something once, can do it again at will and avoids boredom by entertaining himself (you just might not like the results), and on top of it all… he’s hyper. I see him being pushed by the wayside. The younger one’s says quiet, so I’m sure it’ll be the same for him.

      Report this comment

      Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

      1. ant

        public schools has an unfair monopoly in communities

        Report this comment

        Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

        1. Gen

          Yes they do, but if they we run as they were twenty years ago, we wouldn’t have the problems we do now.

          There’s no x money for x students… it’s all about getting more money and looking good on paper b/c principals receive extra stipends and bonuses for this and that. There are even “specialists” that do little to nothing making six figure salaries while teachers pay for their own supplies.

          It’s a sad affair; but no one listens to teachers about how to fix it… only to blame them.

          Report this comment

          Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

    2. Nelly

      I agree with most of Ron Paul states but I disagree completely in education. I’ve just graduated from a public school and am now a university student – I can tell you that when public schools are ran correctly that can change a society. My school offered me more oppertunities than most private schools. There was an award winning Journalism program, an IB program, Engineering program, AP classes, partnerships with the local community college, internships, new technology in the classroom, great teachers. One reason for this is because the county I live in spends a good portion of the tax money on the schools in our area. In order to get the same education that I got from my public school my parents would have had to pay over $25,000 per year to get me into one of those great private schools. The sad part is that I know that my school is 1 in 100 public schools, with most of them being horrible schools. What should be done is trying to reform the public school system, not abolish it. The only thing that would do is create greater disparities in wealth with rich parents sending their child to amazing private schools and middle class parents sending to good but not great private schools and poor parents sending their children to barely passable schools. Letting the state take over education would also be wrong as their will be no standards. The state can make test as difficult or as easy as they want. We are now competing with people from Japan, China, Europe, Russia, India and every other and we need to make sure that our educational standards are as high and that our children achieve as much or more as those in other nations. The national government should be allowed to set the standard – and the states should be allowed to decied how to meet them or even if they want to meet them – but more money should go to the states that do meet the standards as incentive.

      Report this comment

      Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

    3. scream619

      I attended private school from k-8th grade. The only public school I ever attended was high school. What a difference! The class size was far larger. Teachers didn’t seem to care if you passed or failed. Also as Aaron mentioned, doing well in school is looked down on by the “popular” students. My parents could not afford to send me to a private high school, otherwise I would have loved to have gone. I think private schools are a great option for parents, and as a parent I ask: Why would you not want to send your child to a school that you know will encourage the development of your child? If they fail, they don’t get paid. Public school teachers get our tax money, regardless.

      Report this comment

      Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

  34. Alex

    Those are good points, and I wonder what Ron Paul’s response would be. I think that by far the biggest factor in a good education is the teacher, and I wouldn’t mind at all if a lot of the money going other ways (welfare, military, subsidies, etc.) now were put into paying teachers more, as long as there were some kind of system (not based on pathetic standardized tests) for eliminating the bad ones. Other than for that (I realize it would be substantial), though, I don’t think there needs to be a whole lot of school funding. A bad teacher in a modernized classroom with new textbooks gives a bad education, and I don’t think there is any way around that. If anything is a good investment of government money, I think it is paying teachers more.

    Report this comment

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

  35. Ryan

    While I would agree that the federal government has not done a good job with regard to education. Leaving the job up to the states would create a gross inequality, especially in states that have a high population of retirees, who would more than likely vote down any educational ballots.

    I’m on your side buddy with almost everything else, except this. Kids don’t have a choice. So, when a parent doesn’t want to be involved, or just simply isn’t there, the child suffers. If they neglect their children, which I see quite a bit, those children lose.

    It has to be standardized, and improved. The system has been the same for centuries. Change is needed….actual change.

    I agree there is no provision in the consitution, and I’m on the fence about whether or not there should be, but the massive lack of college educated kids, and even the high school dropout rate is staggering.

    We no longer live in a society where a high school diploma will allow one to be innovative and spur the economy. Yes, there are outliers and rare opportunities, but for the most part, college is now a necessity. Children not graduating from high school is just shocking.

    Personal responsibilty people! Bring it back!

    Report this comment

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

    1. Chris

      Coming from a family where there is no incentive for education, why would we think that attending a government-school would be any different in that particular childs mind? If they lack interest, and its based, developed, created at the home between the parents and the children, from a very young age, well then by giving them a “fair chance” wont help anything, neither private or governmental. You can not force people to educate themselves.
      Thats just what i think.

      Report this comment

      Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

    2. we the people

      hey you really think that the same guys who are responsible for the IRS and fed reserve really want us to become critical thinkers. Ive attended public school and they are fuk…ing horrible. i wanted to run out screaming pulling my hair out. trust me these guys knew exactly what they were doing when they subsidized education. they want a population of people who rather entertain themselves with the idiot tube. rather than enjoy the process of learning. once you know who your enemy is(the fed) and know what weapons they use(money=budget). If you don’t believe me ask any teenager in any public school what is the bill of rights or about the fed. and you’ll see a glassy look in their eyes.

      Report this comment

      Like or Dislike: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 0

      1. Delia

        Ha! So true. I have just been reading about this very subject in “Someone’s gotta say it” by Neal Boortz. Quite an eye opener and very scary (he’s hilarious, tho). The govt is only interested in churning out a generation of less than mediocre zombies who will obediently pay their taxes and not rock the boat.

        Report this comment

        Like or Dislike: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 0

    3. kitty

      Ryan,

      I fail to see how one can take personal responsibility and still have standardization. Standardization always takes away our personal responsibility as well as our civil rights, the current educational system is a violation of our rights per the 9th, 11th, and 13th amendments to the constitution.

      Please read anything by John Taylor Gatto and his referenced materials. Much of his work is free to read on his website.

      Report this comment

      Like or Dislike: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 0

      1. Ryan

        Standardization is a bare minimum. There are always those that will do the minimum, but at least with high standards (and not including subgroups), those parents that do not take their own responsibility seriously toward their own child won’t have a hugely detrimental effect on said child.

        If children in Atlanta (hypothetical here) are being taught theology and english with no other cirriculum, and kids in Nevada are being taught a wide breadth of things, including science and math, you can see how the divide would grow.

        I don’t necessarily agree with public schooling, but minimum standards for students.

        The 9′th ammendment arguement is valid and brings up federalist and anti-federalist sentiment, though your other two listings here are non-sequitur.

        Its a tough subject, and has a lot of debate left in it. Remember, what I said was a minimum, not a maximum and not a limit. Don’t assume I’m speaking of robot armies of kids.

        Report this comment

        Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

        1. kitty

          Your first point: Even if standardization is a bare minimum, many will only aspire to achieve that minimum if given no real opportunities to aspire to instead.

          I understand your theory, but do not see it as any better than what is already undermining our country. Yes, there is the possibility for divide, but that very same possibility allows for more specialized growth as well.

          Please explain to me how the 11th and 13th amendments are non-sequitur here. I admit, I do not understand your point there.

          Report this comment

          Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

          1. kitty

            I double checked, I apologize, it is the 14th, not the 11th.

            Report this comment

            Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

          2. Ryan

            The 14′th doesn’t follow either. You would have to phrase something specific from these ammendments that show exactly waht you are trying to point out. I can’t guess for you.

            What is destroying the opportunities are the government run schools.

            When you say specialized……that sounds great, but when kids in Alabama are getting a high school education that is equivalent to a 4′th grade Michigan education, there is a problem.

            This would be all moot if ALL parents gave a crap. They don’t, and kids suffer.

            Also, I never said how high the minimum would be. There will always be those that go above and beyond, and also those that fail.

            And if you are reaching to compare slavery (involuntary servitude) to public education, you have reached too far.

            Report this comment

            Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

          3. kitty

            You have not answered my questions.I asked for an explanation, and you gave me a bunch of garbage. I am not sure you have actually read the amendments or understand them from what you have said.

            If you are for freedom of the individual, as I am, and RP is, then you have to realize that some individuals will NOT have the same view point as you, and what you think of as inferior may be excellence for someone else.

            Why don’t you read the DEFINITION of slavery and then tell me that our current COMPULSORY schooling system is not.

            Report this comment

            Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

          4. Ryan

            The 11′th ammendment isn’t even close to applying here, which makes me think you made another mistake. It would also be a gross misuse of the 13′th ammendment to make an arguement against public schooling by comparing it to slavery.

            RP is for a lot of things, some of which I agree with and others I do not.

            And it is pretty obvious that not everyone shares the same viewpoint……as Obama is in office.

            Report this comment

            Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

        2. kitty

          Apparently you and I just cannot agree , and you just want to dance around the question I asked you – HOW?
          Please explain your point. If you cannot answer this with any sort of valid argument, there is no point in continuing.
          I made a correction to my previous statement when I realized that you were correct on one point, I am willing to make others if you show me where they are. There are many violations of many of the Amendments with public schooling. I am glad you can see one of them at least. Again I do not understand how it is going too far, please show me. Saying that without justification is no different than yelling louder to make your point, especially when I have conceded a mistake I made, as well as asked for a reasonable explanation 3 times now.
          Portion of 14th that is relevant: my argument relates to liberty:
          No State shall make or enforce any law which shall abridge the privileges or immunities of citizens of the United States; nor shall any State deprive any person of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law; nor deny to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws.

          Report this comment

          Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

          1. Ryan

            I’m not dancing around anything. The 14′th ammendment is irrelavent because it says right there in black and white, “NO STATE.”

            The feds are not a state.

            Nor would it even apply to individual states, because it talks about due process of law.

            You are reaching for straws.

            Report this comment

            Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

    4. Lindsey Brutus

      Ryan: The amendment that applies here is the 10th amendment. All powers not specifically designated to the Federal government will be reserved to the states. Education is not mentioned in the constitution so the states are responsible for it and not the Federal government. I say abolish the Department of Education!!!!!!!!!!!!

      Report this comment

      Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 1

      1. Ryan

        Now that I can agree with. It doesn’t mention medicare and medicaid either. Nor does it mention any of the other multitude of government agencies. What is DOES mention is a general welfare clause……and thus the department of education, which can be stretched into the “general welfare” of the people.

        It is so plainly obvious that the delegates are not listening to the people, and why should they? We have a very diverse population of undereducated, ignorant people that wish to continue repeating history.

        Do I think that is a gross misinterpretation of the 10′th ammendment? Yes.

        It IS nice to see that ever since the patriot act was signed into law, people are coming out to take a new look at the constitution and what our government is doing to destroy its principles. Unfortunately, many look at the words, pass on by, and then ignore them to be enthralled by the media and power of numbers.

        Report this comment

        Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 1

  36. Christine

    If you don’t want to receive the emails of new comments, go to the bottom of this or any topic to find the link that says “Manage your subscriptions”. Follow the directions there to stop receiving email notifications.

    Report this comment

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

1 2 3 13

Leave a Reply