Education

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Ron Paul works towards the elimination of the inefficient Department of Education, leaving education decisions to be made at the state, local or personal level. Parents should have the right to spend their money on the school or method of schooling they deem appropriate for their children.

On November 14, 2008 Ron Paul said in a New York Times interview:

“First, the Constitution does not authorize the Department of Education, and the founders never envisioned the federal government dictating those education policies.

Second, it is a huge bureaucracy that squanders our money. We send billions of dollars to Washington and get back less than we sent. The money would be much better off left in states and local communities rather than being squandered in Washington.

Finally, I think that the smallest level of government possible best performs education. Teachers, parents, and local community leaders should be making decisions about exactly how our children should be taught, not Washington bureaucrats.

The Department of Education has given us No Child Left Behind, massive unfunded mandates, indoctrination, and in some cases, forced medication of our children with psychotropic drugs. We should get rid of all of that and get those choices back in the hands of the people.”

Note: This summary of Ron Paul’s position has been determined to be incomplete! Contact us to join RonPaul.com as a voluntary editor. Help us set the record straight and keep this page up-to-date.

709 responses to “Education”

  1. regisjbeakensr

    1.7 trillion dollars a year sorry guess i am stupid thats for colleges.that money pays on debt ceiling and higher end jobs would be no longer in as much needed as now plenty high end jobs. if local gov’t handles it every kid would get the chance for community jobs. this is your states discission.i’m tired god bless peace to all

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  2. regisjbeakensr

    okay, i have alzheimers and make mistake typing, but my points are made unless you are stupid

    for rural areas how do you go to school now? you would go to the same school pay a little more state tax and go year round. this allows a 6th grader to start picking college courses. allowing every child to have a bachelor degree in 12 years. so where is the problem i just took all the free money the gov’t spends on 4 years college. that is 624 billion dollars per small school then 250 schools minimum.

    1.7 billion dollars a year saved. everbody knows bring troops home save 6 trillion dollars. examine how much freebies we give others. welfare goes illegals goes we take jobs and that alone takes unemployment to 1.7% rehab all possible disabled. no free stuff like druggies with 2 kids no dad

    gets 1200 a month ssi and food stamps 240 a month i worked for 37.5 yrs making descent moneyi get 200 dollars more than my worthless drug doing sister with 2 kids its 400 a person how many trillion does that make ssi needs examined and rate up to minimum wage for gods sake.

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  3. EvanEggleston

    Wouldn’t limiting public education to a local level squander opportunities from people in less populated, or more rural areas? I would like some clarification on how this would help, the son of some farmer living out in the country one day become a biological engineer. Sure he could do it, but it would be far less likely, and a lot more influence to put him on that direction. I hope I am wrong, but it just seems like it would turn into China’s system of being born into a family of janitors, you are a janitor, only this is a bit more on the community level.

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    1. mark.mcmillin

      My parents went to school in small rural towns of less than 2000 people in Iowa in the 1940s and 50s and both were national merit scholars. Clearly the small towns can handle it.

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      1. tale1695

        @mark.mcmillin Small towns cannot handle it. Your parents were living in “small rural towns of less than 2000 people.” I am living in a small rural town of less than 800 people in Idaho in the 2000s and 10s. I live thirty minutes away from a town whose school is one failed levy away from shutting down. Either way, our goal isn’t just to be able to ‘handle it.’ We should have an education system where all schools and students within those schools can and will flourish.

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  4. regisjbeakensr

    save unemployment .5 %with my tax program social security is safe forever stop worrying and medicare. fed icome tax pulls at least4 trillion dollars so in 3 months our debt is paidso one year of making people obey the laws ihave 10 billion dollars. i’m not done searching. accountability for everr dime insurance companies keep getting richeri’ll investigate that maybe ron paul already has he is an intelligent man so in 2 years we’re +5.5 trillion dollars to the good. every 6 years it doubles at 20% charge cards 17% 5 years double. we’re making 14 trillion a year times 6 84 trillion in ron pauls term. challenge me on anything and i will respond

    »crosslinked«

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    1. PinBlue

      I’ll challenge your education. Learn how to construct a proper sentence, then a proper paragraph. Maybe then your thoughts would be coherent enough to understand.

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  5. regisjbeakensr

    if we go local noone gets free money from gov’t for 1 education 2 room and 0 means nothing my plan don’t ask for any thing why should i pay others schooling no immigrants legal ot not get free ride illegas get free ride home. does anybody but me get bothered by felons being treated like lazy soldiers. work them12 hrs a day on chai gangs under heavy guard cause a fuss shoot a limb off happens againend their life. cruel who he raped or killed their families suffer daily for hid mistake. one life you take and your life will work 12hrs a day we’ll find work. mutiny and you’ll treated like the dog you are 220 volts will stand you up and no meals that dayfor every problem there is a solution how many trillions a year did that

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  6. regisjbeakensr

    i’d like local where we can go and see whats being spent and if i convince the borrough to go with my year round schooling and many students with bachelor degree at 12 years saving 2 trillion dollars in grants and loans. alll students that apply themselves will have bacherlors some will start masters each individual goes at their pace after 5th grade 6th you pick your courses parents consent and you go.do away with fed funding their close to home so room board no longer an issue all locals will see my entire plan on my website, but it cuts the budget 8 trillion dollars in one term 4 years.bring home troops yesterday thers 3trillion in obamas time 6 trilion in paul’s time. my count those 2 things make 14 trillion dollars

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  7. regisjbeakensr

    i gave a rather lengthly comment doing the country alot of good saving half a trillion dollars a year.. stop gov’t spending my plan for people voting every bill gets results. if tied and over 70% of america says then thats the way it is one page bill 80 pages of legal terms 80% of the people are lost thats where crooks liars and thiefs come in. Bush is a warmonger thief liar 45trillion to war i could destroy the earth with that money him and obama are uncle toms.ok bipolar moment i hate them both the out the debt crisis where it is. my plan pays 14.5 trillion dollars off in 2.5 years maxinmum . see other comment by name i’ve got a plan on all issues short and sweet

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  8. machinebp23

    Herman Cain isnt the answer either. He still has connections to the federal reserve..

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  9. machinebp23

    At the end of the day, Ron Paul is the only person that will save this country. Some of his ideas arent perfect but look where Obama has gotten us. Everyone thought he was going to save the world. No need to bring up Bush. He honestly is our best choice. He has not given in to corruption like everyone else. This isnt a left or right issue. We need to stop having allegiance to our party and start having allegiance to the Bill of Rights and Constitution.. H

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  10. regisjbeakensr

    lets talk education year round. this allows a 6th grader to pick his subjects for college math and english mandatory that gives him 6 years to get an bachelors degree to all who apply themselves with parent guidance. have high end jobs in 12 years. thats where we need people now not enough drs. too many lawyers but accounting everyone needs accountants. you say whose paying for extra time the school taxes. feds get all monies from grants loans housing books food utilities cable computers a small college 20,000 tuition not counting extras 12000 students 240,000,000 1 school yes its definitely in the trillions saved. you see this how you pay the debt keep things simple no loopholes homescholl your alternative school taxes are paid by everyone. most families both parents work and when are you finding time to give a good education the bad things they can learn on net playing with other kids don’t blame school for everything you get what you choose life is like that. i like debt getting paid everywhere you look.

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  11. Cynicism and Disenfranchisement – Could Ron Paul’s Libertarian world really work? « LongBrevity {…}

    [...] seas in an immediate and orderly fashion, when he talks about eliminating the Federal Reserve and the Department of Education, when he talks about abolishing the Federal Income Tax and moving back to a Gold Standard; when he [...]

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  12. Karl Schlegel

    First of all Thomas Jefferson never envisioned the NEA. Read the June 2011 Atlantic Monthly:

    “The Failure of American Schools

    Who better to lead an educational revolution than Joel Klein, the prosecutor who took on the software giant Microsoft? But in his eight years as chancellor of New York City’s school system, the nation’s largest, Klein learned a few painful lessons of his own—about feckless politicians, recalcitrant unions, mediocre teachers, and other enduring obstacles to school reform.”

    Following are some of Joe Klein’s comments:

    “Three years ago, in a New York Times article detailing her bid to become head of the American Federation of Teachers union, Randi Weingarten boasted that despite my calls for “radical reform” to New York City’s school system, Mayor Michael Bloomberg and I had achieved only “incremental” change. It seemed like a strange thing to crow about, but she did have something of a point. New York over the past nine years has experienced what Robert Schwartz, the academic dean of Harvard’s education school, has described as “the most dramatic and thoughtful set of large-scale reforms going on anywhere in the country,” resulting in gains such as a nearly 20-point jump in graduation rates. But the city’s school system is still not remotely where it needs to be.

    That story holds more than true for the country at large. Nearly three decades after A Nation at Risk, the groundbreaking report by the National Commission on Excellence in Education, warned of “a rising tide of mediocrity that threatens our very future as a Nation and a people,” the gains we have made in improving our schools are negligible—even though we have doubled our spending (in inflation-adjusted dollars) on K–12 public education. On America’s latest exams (the National Assessment of Educational Progress), one-third or fewer of eighth-grade students were proficient in math, science, or reading. Our high-school graduation rate continues to hover just shy of 70 percent, according to a 2010 report by the Editorial Projects in Education Research Center, and many of those students who do graduate aren’t prepared for college. ACT, the respected national organization that administers college-admissions tests, recently found that 76 percent of our high-school graduates “were not adequately prepared academically for first-year college courses.”

    Further on Mr. Klein writes:

    “If the forces behind reform seem scattered and weak, those defending the status quo—the unions, the politicians, the bureaucrats, and the vendors—are well organized and well financed. Having spent eight years trying to ignite a revolution in New York City’s schools under Bloomberg’s leadership, I am convinced that without a major realignment of political forces, we won’t get the dramatic improvements our children need.”

    You will never break the NEA’s grip as long as education is administered at the federal and state level. Education needs to be local. What we need is a voucher system where parents make the decision about where their children go to school. The NEA doesn’t like that because it takes away their control.

    The late Albert Shanker, president of the American Federation of Teachers, reportly said: “When schoolchildren start paying union dues, that’s when I’ll start representing the interests of schoolchildren.”

    So, what does Mr. Jefferson have to say about the teachers unions?

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  13. GFW

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    1. John C

      GFW,

      What is ID?

      Why are you so angry about parents having an option to homeschool their children? Were you a loner, geek, or nerd in school who was bullied and made fun of daily? And now you want all kids to have to suffer your fate because you are so callous over it now? Or were you the popular athlete who everyone wanted to hang out with, but deep down you were severely self-conscious about your self-worth and your struggles to get good grades? And you don’t want those nerdy homeschooled kids to escape putting their dues in socially at school before becoming your boss in the work place? Whatever it stems from, I’m sorry you had to go through that.

      So what’s wrong with giving parents, and all citizens for that matter, the option to participate to the level of their own desire in our system? Isn’t that what you call freedom? Does freedom guarantee uniformity or perfection? No. And neither do governmental laws and regulations. But at least Ron Paul’s suggestions leave a high degree of freedom in tact. Prohibition of ideas, religions, lifestyles, products, currencies, and services by the government is such an archaic system. It’s time you educated yourself better about the history of world governments and the recent advent of the idea of personal liberty for all citizens within a United States. The purpose of the states uniting is to ensure stronger protection of individual liberty and to ensure uniform contract law between individuals, and to ensure unencumbered trade and travel between individuals living at a distance from one another.

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      1. JamesStevenDriscoll

        Umm I never learned that on any level of education.

        I was taught he waged the war to maintain the union.

        “I never fought this war to free the black man” Abe Lincoln

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      2. tale1695

        I dislike calling people out on their education, but since you were calling out @gfw on their education, I feel that it is necessary to point out that you attacked ‘gfw’ on a personal level, which is never acceptable in a debate situation. It is inappropriate and only points out the weaknesses in your argument.

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    2. Rich Grise

      When has Ron Paul ever advocated teaching Creationism?

      Can you back up this ludicrous claim, or are you simply ranting?

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      1. LT

        I believe GFW’s point is not that Ron Paul advocates teaching Creationism, but rather that federal oversight keeps Creationism out of the classroom, and that Creationism and intelligent design will be taught if that oversight is removed as Dr. Paul suggests.

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        1. John B C

          If a few more kids learn about creationism, big deal. That’s nothing compared to the fact that they all are currently taught that peace couldn’t exist without Big Government, when in fact the truth is that Big Government is the cause of hundreds of millions of murders and deaths throughout the last century not counting all the wars that wouldn’t have existed without Big Government.

          That’s nothing compared to the fact that they learn that Lincoln saved the blacks from slavery and saved our country from disaster, when in fact he hated blacks and wanted to deport them all, and his real motivation for the Civil War was to strengthen the Federal Government’s power while simultaneously taking away state rights. If Lincoln really cared about the slaves, he could have simply purchased them all and then set them free. It would have cost much less and no one would have died (just like England and other countries got rid of slavery, none of them had civil wars to do it). The real reason the South was seceding from the Union was to escape Lincoln’s oppressive federal import taxes. Lincoln used slavery as a politically correct reason to invade the South. He even orchestrated the tension at Fort Sumpter to trick the South into firing the “first shot,” so that he wouldn’t appear to be the aggressor.

          I could write volumes on the crap the government run school system teaches our children currently. Worrying about adding Creationism to the mix is simply a talking point Big Brother has implanted into your head to keep the wool over your eyes so you can’t see the 1,000 pound gorilla staring you in the face.

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        2. JamesStevenDriscoll

          @John B C

          Umm I never learned that on any level of education.

          I was taught he waged the war to maintain the union.

          “I never fought this war to free the black man” Abe Lincoln

          In fact of all the History courses I’ve taken has never stated his orginal intent was the free the slaves and he was infact of supporter of “back to africa” movement which mind at the time Many Free’d slaves supported as well.

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  14. Wysocki3421

    Obama for president AGAIN!
    DEMOCRATS RULE! WHOO! :)

    …pahaha, y’all mad? ;3

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    1. Robert Richards

      No I am not mad about you voting for Obama. I think you are severely deluded, but no, I’m not mad. I fail to see any benefit in re-electing a president that has not benefited the country in any way during their first term. I suspect it has more to do with you operating under a blind devotion to the Democrat Party regardless of who is running. However, if you want to take such an irresponsible stance toward your country and your life and waste your vote that is certainly up to you. Personally, I don’t waste my time with the superficial and ridiculous high-schoolesque popularity contest mentality of the mainstream media. I give the election process the respect it deserves and take my responsibility as a voter very seriously. I evaluate ALL the candidates very carefully, separating the solid facts from the propaganda, just as I would of any person applying for a job. Then I cast my vote for the best person for the job. In this case, it is undoubtedly Ron Paul.

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  15. faithful fury

    Can we have faith in one another and in process? can we elevate our consciousness and learn to come from compassion, to help those who need it, and to know that we will be guided and we will find our way in a society that is free and open. THAT environment will in itself change the way we think and feel, and our education and all other systems will come from that change for the better in each of us, and they will be better. You are right on Ron Paul. Give us freedom and watch the miracles.

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    1. Rich Grise

      Nobody’s going to “give us freedom.” (except Ron Paul, who would do a lot to get Big Gubmint off our backs.)

      We have to get out there and TAKE it, as our Founding Fathers did.

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  16. Nancarrow

    one more Jefferson quote:

    1814 July 5. “I hope the necessity will at length be seen of establishing institutions, here as in Europe, where every branch of science, useful at this day, may be taught in it’s highest degrees.” (to John Adams, Peterson, Writings, 1343.)

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    1. John C

      Again, this doesn’t specify if he wanted the Federal government to establish, fund, and regulate these institutions or rather the private sector.

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  17. Nancarrow

    Quotes from Thomas Jefferson, a true supporter of strong PUBLIC Education:

    1786 August 13. (to George Wythe) “I think by far the most important bill in our whole code is that for the diffusion of knowledge among the people. No other sure foundation can be devised, for the preservation of freedom and happiness…Preach, my dear Sir, a crusade against ignorance; establish & improve the law for educating the common people. Let our countrymen know that the people alone can protect us against these evils [tyranny, oppression, etc.] and that the tax which will be paid for this purpose is not more than the thousandth part of what will be paid to kings, priests and nobles who will rise up among us if we leave the people in ignorance.”[2]

    1787 December 20. (to James Madison) “Above all things I hope the education of the common people will be attended to ; convinced that on their good sense we may rely with the most security for the preservation of a due degree of liberty.”[4]

    1818 January 14. (to Joseph C. Cabell) “Now let us see what the present primary schools cost us, on the supposition that all the children of 10. 11. & 12. years old are, as they ought to be, at school: and, if they are not, so much the work is the system; for they will be untaught, and their ignorance & vices will, in future life cost us much dearer in their consequences, than it would have done, in their correction, by a good education.”[9]

    1818 January 14. (to Joseph C. Cabell) “A system of general instruction, which shall reach every description of our citizens from the richest to the poorest, as it was the earliest, so will it be the latest, of all the public concerns in which I shall permit myself to take an interest.”[10]

    1818 August 4. The objects of this primary eduction [university education] determine its character and limits. These objects are To give to every citizen the information he needs for the transaction of his own business; To enable him to calculate for himself, and to express and preserve his ideas, his contracts and accounts, in writing; To improve by reading, his morals and faculties; To understand his duties to his neighbors and country, and to discharge with competence the functions confided to him by either; To know his rights; to exercise with order and justice those he retains; to choose with discretion the fiduciary of those he delegates; and to notice their conduct with diligence, with candor and judgement; And, in general, to observe with intelligence and faithfulness all the social relations under which he shall be placed. To instruct the mass of our citizens in these, their rights, interests and duties, as men and citizens, being then the objects of education in the primary schools, whether privet or public, in them should be taught reading, writing and numerical arithmetic, the elements of mensuration…and the outlines of geography and history.”[11]

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    1. John C

      Nancarrow,

      Thank you for trying to clarify your points with more quotes from Jefferson, I appreciate learning more about him! He clearly had a passion for educating the masses from the poor on up, and he seems to have supported some laws regarding this issue. But what you have added here doesn’t explain what the laws were he supported, it doesn’t say whether he supported laws regarding education at the Federal level or not, and it doesn’t say how the education was to be funded. So can you find any more quotes or data to answer these questions, since these additional quotes still give me no reason to change my position away from Ron Paul’s position of letting states and counties and cities decide the details of education of children rather than Federal government?

      Thanks again,

      John C

      P.S. Jefferson had lots of good things to write and say prior to being President, but once in office, he actually wasn’t a very good President, he did some things to strengthen the Federal government’s power that should not have been done, things that were contrary to the beliefs he espoused earlier in his life.

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      1. matthew

        Oh yeah, not a good president. Too bad we had Jefferson in office so he could negotiate the freaking LOUISIANA PURCHASE, perhaps the second most important step to building our nation after the revolutionary war.

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        1. John C

          It was certainly good if you like having a really strong Federal Government that has a monopoly on exploiting its citizens because they have no where close to move to as an alternative. This is the point of having many states, so that if one gets too overbearing in its taxation and regulation, then its citizens can leave to another state close by. This threat keeps the state governments from getting too big. But when there is a Federal government oppressing the people through high taxes and regulations, then running to another state does no good. So, the Louisiana Purchase would have been good if we had stuck to a constitutionally limited Federal government. But thanks to Lincoln, Wilson, FDR and others, we didn’t. So now we can’t even run to the West coast, because Jefferson bought that land up during his Presidency.

          Maybe if he hadn’t bought it, the settlers in the West could have had their own revolution against France or whoever owned it. They could have started their own, competing constitution with the US. Then we would at least have two options. Now, there’s no escaping our huge oppressive Federal Government unless we go to sweltering Mexico or frigid Canada.

          But most likely if my scenario played out, Lincoln would have waged war on the West coast and annexed it into the US anyway.

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  18. Docten

    If you reward these countries with access to markets, you relegate these people to a life of poverty and abuse forever

    Leave education to the states and local people? Haven’t you been watching Michele Bachmann or Rick Perry? What local people do you know? The local people around me are morons and if you let them control education it will be creationism and idiocy.

    I can’t tell whether Libertarians do not care about the poor and needy or they honestly believe that when government ignores problems they go away.

    Our education system sucks, but turning it over to the “loons” is not the answer.

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    1. Tori Alexander

      Those “loons” are running for President of the federal government, and if either wins he/she may decide to put creationism into the curriculum for the entire nation. At least if the decision is left to the states and communities, educational professionals will have more say. I have more faith in teachers than in governments to teach our children.

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      1. Nancarrow

        Governments don’t teach. Just because they fund schools doesnt make them the teachers.

        Thats the same BS argument that people have with Public/ non-profit health care. The care isnt provided by the Government, it is simply being financially supported by them, at a fair and more cost effective rate than any private FOR PROFIT Insurer can offer.

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    2. Wildebeest

      It’s better to have a nearby, weaker idiot making the decisions that can be realistically opposed than an idiot on a national scale getting to make the decisions for every single school in the country. Libertarians aren’t suggesting that a problem will go away if ignored; libertarians place responsibility on the people they are attempting to empower to act.

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    3. Nancarrow

      Well said Docten.
      There needs to be sound NATIONAL standards, like in any other SUCCESSFUL educational system of the world. It CAN and IS done well in Finland, South Korea, Hong Kong, New Zealand, Canada, Australia, etc… they all produce very intelligent children via PUBLIC schools.

      Here is a wiki paste: For all you “Thomas Jefferson” worshippers here:

      “After leaving the Presidency, Jefferson continued to be active in public affairs. He wanted to found a new institution of higher learning, specifically one free of church influences, where students could specialize in many new areas not offered at other universities. Jefferson believed educating people was a good way to establish an organized society. He believed such schools should be paid for by the general public, so less wealthy people could be educated as students. A letter to Joseph Priestley, in January 1800, indicated that he had been planning the University for decades before its founding.

      In 1819 he founded the University of Virginia. Upon its opening in 1825, it was the first university to offer a full slate of elective courses to its students. One of the largest construction projects to that time in North America, the university was notable for being centered about a library rather than a church. No campus chapel was included in Jefferson’s original plans. Until his death, Jefferson invited students and faculty of the college to his home.

      The University was designed as the capstone of the educational system of Virginia. In his vision, any citizen of the state could attend school with the sole criterion being ability.”

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      1. John C

        Nancarrow,
        What’s your point about Jefferson? I agree with what the quote says because no where in it does it say that his idea of these schools includes being funded by Federal income taxes. It says funded by the general public. That can be completely in line with a libertarian viewpoint as long as the funds are voluntarily donated to the school from the general public (just like all endowments are created from private donations by alumni of private universities in the US today). Many poor students attend private universities today with private scholarships, I was one of them.

        So what’s your point about Jefferson’s vision on a non-religious centered university? What does it have to do with national standards or stealing money from one person to educate someone else’s kids, like they do in the foreign countries you mention?

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    4. Robert Richards

      @ Docten… just curious… do you think those “loons and morons” ,as you call them, have gotten any smarter under the Federal run educational system, or are they in fact the product of and the prime examples of the inherent problems of the Federal system? If you look at the statistics the cost of education has steadily increased in America while we have steadily and simultaneously dropped to the bottom of the lists in international test scores in every subject. That certainly won’t help America compete internationally. Mandates instituted by the Federal government like No Child Left Behind have only proven to make the problem worse. Some schools, even largely statewide such as in Georgia, have been caught changing student’s test answers or giving them the answers to artificially raise test scores and increase the funds they receive from the Federal government. That fraudulent behavior certainly isn’t helping our kids become smarter. According to statistics, test scores and graduation rates for home schooled children have shown to be considerably higher than their public school counterparts.

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      1. Robert Richards

        Here is another point… it is much harder to judge what is effective and what isn’t when it is imposed unilaterally across the board on every school nationwide. However, if one state is doing one thing and another state is doing another, it is easier to do a comparison and learn from each other. The feedback is quicker and adjustments can be made more easily to utilize what is working and toss out or revise what isn’t.

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      2. mark

        Check out Charlotte Iserbyte’s youtube video called “The Mis-education Of America” and “The Deliberate Dumbing Down Of America.” I believe it will answer ALL of your questions regarding our pitiful education system.

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  19. johnboy

    60′s the second article that you sent couldnt be farther from the truth of who Ron Paul is. First the author either doesnt know Dr. Pauls stance on trade or doesnt know what the term isolationist means. Secondly to say he only likes the rich and he doesnt care about people on social security? he is the only one that is fighting the FED who has a delibrate inflationary policy. HIS questioning led Ben Bernanke to admit that the FED aims at keeping an inflation rate each year and that that policy would hurt anyone on a fixed income. Third the claims of hating homosexuals or minorities is false. he has apologied for not checking better for other people writing in his name decades ago already but his policy is much more in line with Martin Luther King who stated an end needed to be put to quotas. Quotas by thier very nature define people purely by skin color. Its only the flip side of the same coin. As far as homosexuality goes most of the article only questions why he does it. who cares why? his plans would further the cause of gay marraige far beyond anyone else in the field including the present administration.

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  20. 60srad

    Wrong link, even though that one will educate you too, once you realize that it’s only “class warfare” when we fight back against the corporate pricks. Here’s the correct link: http://www.alternet.org/story/152192/5_reasons_progressives_should_treat_ron_paul_with_extreme_caution_–_%27cuddly%27_libertarian_has_some_very_dark_politics?page=entire

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    1. John C

      Wow…. 60srad, your heart is in the right place, but you are obviously a bit confused. I read most of the articles of both links you posted, and they are woven with bits and pieces of truth, but the conclusions made by the authors show that they really are very confused. It sounds like the typical modern left talking points that are aimed at fostering hatred in individuals for the demonized right-wingers.

      Can’t you see, there is no two-party system. Both the right and left stories are wrong, they are aimed at keeping the two groups so confused and mad at each other, that they never uncover the proper conclusions about how to fix the problems and bring about conditions where there is less gap between the poor and the rich.

      It’s obvious that you can’t see past your own anger toward your make believe enemy of the right (anger over racism, multinational corporations, etc.)
      If you really want to understand how the world really works, if you really want to understand political and economic history, so you can make better conclusions about how to get back at the rich and the multinational corporations, then please go to mises.org and spend an hour a day reading and listening to their free educational material written by very intelligent authors from around the world.
      My favorite author so far, though he is hard to read because he performs mental/verbal jujitsu on his critics, is Hans Hermann Hoppe. You can download his books and lectures for free at mises.org.

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  21. 60srad

    Here’s some education for you doofi who support this prick: http://www.alternet.org/media/152154/how_fox_news_and_the_gop_help_the_ultra-rich_get_even_richer_?page=entire

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    1. Jamie

      I fail to see the connection you are making to this article and the information found within it and the platform Ron Paul is running on. Perhaps your personal political preferences got in the way of allowing yourself the opportunity to be educated on the individual and candidate you slandered. Educate yourself on your options and do not allow the media to make this important choice for you.

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  22. Danita

    So many people spout off about the programs Ron Paul wants shut down, I wish they would do their research first! He’s not eliminating them at all, he’s just saying to put these programs in the hands of the states, not the Federal Government. America is so large that to assume one demographic’s ideals as representative of the entire nation is ludicrous. Many Americans fought and died for our Freedom and now we seem to want to throw it away, sad.

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  23. Patrick Harris

    Every year our educational system, governed by the DOE (should be called the DOA), spends more money preparing kids for prison by exposing our kids to prison like conditions, and less on education. And if you dare explain to kids in this system how much different college is in regards to the respect students get, they start getting outraged because they see they are not being prepared for college, but rather for prison… great system huh?

    The less rights people have, the less capable they are making moral decisions.

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  24. » Ron Paul is Not a Serious Candidate ad augusta per angust

    [...] candidate are likely to last long enough for him to say something really crazy, like “let’s get rid of the DOE!“, at which point Barack Obama wins by default [...]

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  25. Rachel

    Dear politicians and citizens (and aliens, both legal and illegal) alike,

    After commenting and subscribing to this entry, which actions caused each message to be sent directly to my phone, I must say that I find it easy to understand those who are not willing to get involved. If you must comment, please do so respectively. Insults, ignorance and/or bickering will not lead our youth in a positive direction. Each of us needs to remember that our perspectives are limited. What we have to gain from others, is greater than what we have to offer others.

    As for me, my education was neglected. As a member of a large family, with low income, in a school district that claims to be effective, I had to teach myself. If you were to read through this message, as you are now, you would most likely find grammatical errors. Yet, as a “high school drop-out” living in a “college town”, my knowledge of the English language is still more advanced than a very high percentage of even the university graduates in the area. Those who have earned an associates, bachelors, or even a masters degree still don’t know basic English, our native tongue!

    Our education system is failing. I’d like to believe that we can all agree on that point. So, let’s make some changes. My personal opinion is that we ought to do away with most of the national education programs. Just as with large corporations, when we have high overhead, the size of the cracks in the system can easily grow. Each department holds individual duties, and are limited to those areas in which they “specialize” or manage. Thus, when a unique situation comes up, they can easily pass the buck. A national program simply can not micromanage this many children.

    Let’s make guidelines and systems that are genuinely effective. Currently, we have schools that are forcing children to leave when they do not meet standards. This practice is unacceptable. These children need more time and attention. (Yes, at home, but also in school.) There will most likely always be single parent households, or parents who don’t care or don’t have the means, time, etc.. to properly educate their children. This is why public schools are in place. To educate those who can’t educate their own, and further educate those with limited knowledge, not to add to the burdens of those who are falling behind.

    If we want a good community, we have to be the good in the community. We all do.

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  26. Dawn

    I like his stance on lots of issues, but eliminating the DOE? Having lived and taught in another country, I have to say that’s about one of the worst things that we could do. The DOE needs to be better managed, and slimmed down — not eliminated altogether. It’s true, states need to have more power over the money used for education ; but the laws that govern that education need to remain in sync and coordinated on a federal level. That’s basic.

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    1. Tori Alexander

      Why do you suppose that being “in sync” is a good thing for education? Children need to be taught how to think, not what to think. Or actually, all human beings are natural learners. They just need exposure to lots of different things. Consistency in education is deadly to thought.

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      1. bubba

        Tori,

        I agree with big chunks of what you say but then…um…I lose you. Certainly the DOE has enormous failings, but there are some things you may want to consider:

        i. It hasn’t failed everyone. If you look at the data, our education system is one of the best in the world…FOR wealthy kids. Poverty, absentee parents, even poor health care can be shown to all have a stronger correlation to student performance than teachers.

        ii. I am pretty sure you want some consistency in education. Now, I don’t see students until they get to college, BUT it is a hell of a lot harder to teach them when I have to catch ‘em up to speed because they have competing accounts of what ‘Darwinism’, ‘Science’, ‘Truth’, ‘Knowledge’ (and more often than not their accounts have nothing to do with the profession and/or conventional standards).

        iii. Ultimately, there are conventions that are really helpful to know. A whole slew of the kids I see who came from home-schooling backgrounds are missing enormous chunks of stuff. The person who is taught that ‘science’ has confirmed that dinosaurs and humans lived together, that women are ‘naturally dumber’ than men OR that math and logic are ‘just tools of oppression’ (yes I have encountered students espousing each of these beliefs) are at a decidedly unfair disadvantage just because their parents had some really goofy ideological commitments.

        We can argue about it all you want, but consistency in education is absolutely necessary… and we demonstrate it’s importance when we understand one another: If you and I commit to contradictory meanings of ‘Hello’ then we aren’t going to have much of a conversation (because at least one of us will always be leaving).

        Perhaps these sorts of concerns are a bit too analytic for your liking, but heck, I’m just a follower and you know everybody on this side of the pond (save a few rebels and english department refugees ) has been doing it this way for 120 years. ;)

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        1. Tori Alexander

          @Bubba
          i. There is no reason to assume that the federal DOE has helped anyone. We can just as easily assume that it is the state or local governments providing good schools for those wealthy few. But anyway US students rank 25th in math and 21st in science compared to students in 30 industrialized countries. 68% of US 8th graders can’t read. (broadeducation.org)
          ii. There’s no reason to think that the states and local governments will abandon teaching the empirical method or critical thinking without federal oversight. Those skills are all you need to figure out whether or not what you are being told is valid. (Actually most people in this country don’t use either, but the federal DOE hasn’t helped us there! Federal programs focus on getting kids to regurgitate info for test: that discourages critical thinking.) If you decide, for example, that classic NeoDarwinism should be taught in HS and that only, then students will miss out on important work being done on other evolutionary mechanisms, like symbiosis, repetitive differentiation, lateral gene transfer, and self-organization. Federally funded research programs currently favor NeoDarwinism to the exclusion of many other valid research interests.
          iii With or without a federal DOE some parents are still going to teach their children crazy things. There is no reason to think that state and local governments are going to come up with curricula that are worse that federal gov’t ideas. The federal gov’t has given us “teaching to the test” which is a DISASTER. You may have met some wacky homeschooled kids, but in general, homeschooled kids far out perform their public school counterparts. Just google “homeschooling statistics.”

          We don’t need FEDERAL consistency in education. We can leave it up to the states and local governments to decide curricula. Or better yet, leave it up to the teachers themselves, the ones who actually have professional training in the subject and who actually know each child’s needs. Big government is bad. Top down control doesn’t work.

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          1. bubba

            Tori,

            Again, I agree with a whole bunch of what you say: Heck Yeah! teachers shouldn’t have to teach to a test. Hallelujah! Teachers should be given the freedom to teach how they want and what they want! More local control? You got it!

            However, you are missing a few of my main points:

            1. Your data does not address my concern. You fail to recognize that our schools work really, really, really well (I’ll assume since you reference them you believe PIRLS scores meaningful and relevant)…but they are only working really, really well for students who aren’t in poverty.
            Let’s really consider PIRLS scores. If we look at the public schools which have fewer than 25% of the student population in poverty? That group of schools would have the HIGHEST average score in the world (by quite a bit, we would beat out Sweden by more points than separate the top ten nations). If our school system is the problem, why is it producing the majority of the best students in the world?
            Now, this isn’t to say that everything is perfect. However, it does mean that our education system works really, really well for students who aren’t in poverty.

            2. Do you think it is fair to children to be asked to learn a curriculum that is going to be counterproductive, impractical and just plain against the conventions of the work force/fields they are going to ultimately have to enter?

            3. I still contend that you absolutely believe that some consistency is important (because I can assure you that you aren’t teaching your kids that’Dinosaur’ means Dragon).

            4. As for homeshooling? The data shows that homeschooled students do about as well as their counterparts who have attended public schools in public, secular, colleges and universities (it isn’t fair to compare their performance in Religious institutions because they are likely much more familiar with the curriculum).

            I am all for education reform and I am willing to consider any option, but throwing out the baby, the bathwater and the bathtub doesn’t seem prudent.

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        2. Tori Alexander

          @Bubba.
          I’m starting to repeat myself, but I say it again. We already have state curricula for consistency. Why do you think a national curriculum would be better? As to the dinosaur/dragon idea, it may be that the myth of dragons comes from early discoveries of dinosaur fossils. So maybe dragons are dinosaurs. And maybe dinosaurs survived much longer than current evidence indicates. Maybe human civilization is much older than we’ve assumed, and early coastal cities were flooded in the last great warming trend, and maybe humans did interact with live dinosaurs. We have to keep an open mind. Many scientists argue that dinosaurs still exist today as birds (http://www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/diapsids/avians.html). So my point is that when big government starts deciding what goes in text books and what is excluded, you risk encouraging conformity and this can block inquiry. Teach the tools for gaining knowledge; don’t focusing on teaching facts about the world. Unfortunately, it’s difficult to test for critical thinking skills, and it’s easier to test for how many facts someone knows. Hence, the teaching to test problem, which would be unavoidable if there is a national curriculum that every child needs to be taught.
          Don’t assume that all homeschoolers are religious. I’m an atheist, and I homeschool because public schools do not teach critical thinking and in my opinion are as dogmatic as religious schools, just with a different agenda: manufacturing consumers. I have nothing further to say on the subject of a national curriculum. I’ve said enough.

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          1. John C

            Tori,

            Great comment!! Couldn’t have said it better myself!

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          2. bubba

            Tori,
            Im sorry to have tried your patience. You have certainly said more than could be expected and been generous with your time, but you certainly have not said enough to demonstrate that the DOE is the problem and poverty is not.

            Im a little disappointed that you didn’t address the fact that if we were to only look at schools where fewer than 25% of the students were in poverty we would have the best performing schools in the world. In order for your claim that the DOE hasn’t done any good, you have to explain to me how and why the DOE is responsible for poverty OR how and why the DOE is not responsible for the absolute success of those schools.

            Never in a million years would I infer that all home-schoolers are religious, but a whole bunch of them are and a whole bunch of those end up attending religious schools (because of my location about half of the homeschooled student I encounter are not religious).

            And just for the record, I don’t think anyone would ever want to stop anyone from teaching their kids that dinosaurs and/or birds are dragons, I just hope they won’t complain that people are trying to indoctrinate them or that the man is keeping them down when they fail evolutionary biology in college.

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          3. Tori Alexander

            @Bubba: The federal program No Child Left Behind rewards the wealthy school districts where kids are already doing well and punishes poor school districts where the kids are not doing well, creating further disparities in education and, eventually, wealth. If the federal DOE were effective across the nation, it would have an equalizing effect and we would see LESS disparity. OBVIOUSLY, the kids in wealthy districts do better because their PARENTS are more educated than are the parents of poor children. I have no idea why you think the educational success of the wealthy should be attributed to the federal DOE, unless you’re pointing out the irony that it does favor the wealthy over the poor. It’s not supposed to do that!

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          4. bubba

            Oh and Tori, one more thing…Just a formal, logical consideration. If the DOE is not praiseworthy for the successful programs over which it has authority, then you cannot blame them for the failures…If parents are responsible for success, then they are also responsible for failures.

            I only mention it because it helps your argument. But then you can’t criticize the DOE for anything ‘bad’ you can just point out that it is useless…which you may have been after all along anywho.

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      2. bubba

        Tori,

        Now we are again in complete agreement. Im not wanting to give the DOE the credit or the blame. I want to blame parents, communities and cultural commitments that don’t make a darned bit of sense….So (at the least in the short term) I think completely disbanding the DOE would be educational/intellectual suicide (besides the fact that federal programs demand that schools offer programs which give a umber of children their only meal of the day and their only opportunity to escape pretty terrible homes).

        I’d love to see a day where communities were willing to do these things, but we know they are not. We know that they are interested in ridiculous mandates like voucher programs and No Child Left Behind silliness. I absolutely agree that those programs are horrendous, and they should be changed. But I see it absolutely necessary to have some minimal federal guidelines as to what we expect our citizens to know and learn.

        I guess that was a really long winded way of saying that I think we agree about some of the problems, just disagree about the role in a federal program in offering a solution.

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        1. Robert Richards

          I have to disagree on federal mandates benefiting children with meals. Yes the children do get a meal, but how healthy is it? If you give the child a meal that has little nutritional value, they may have something on their bellies, but it does little to help their health or their grades. The federal school meal program is more of a waste management program than anything else. They take leftovers from the USDA and funnel it to the schools. If the Federal government got out of it, and schools were able to initiate their own programs such as one that required that all the food was grown and supplied within a 100 mile radius of the school, it would not only increase the children’s chances of having healthy meals, but also be beneficial to the local economy.

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          1. Robert Richards

            I should also point out that the local economy being boosted through a locally produced school food program also has the potential to create jobs/increase wages and lower the percentage of poverty stricken children in the schools.

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      3. Nancarrow

        That should not negate a strong DOE. Look at ANY other country that has VERY successful schools, and see that it is centrally run. Finland, South Korea, Hong Kong, Singapore, even Canada.

        It can be done. It should be done.

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  27. FuturePhD

    I agree with Ron Paul on just about every issue facing our country today – we need to get out of the Middle East, eliminate the Federal Reserve, etc. However, I do have some reservations regarding his ideas as they pertain to the Department of Education (DOE). Getting rid of the DOE altogether is a horrible idea, but don’t misunderstand that to mean that I want the DOE to continue on with business as usual. Many of the posts found here point to the challenges that poorer communities and/or states would face if the DOE was eliminated. And, even more importantly, we wouldn’t have consistency across the U.S. in terms of what students would learn in the classroom. I agree that things need to change, but jumping off the deep end and completely closing down the DOE is foolish and would have horrible long-term effects.

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    1. Tori Alexander

      Dear Future PhD.

      I am a Present PhD. Believe me, the federal DOE does not help the education of the underprivileged; it has done the opposite with No Child Left Behind. We have state DOEs and local school boards that require students to study specific subjects. That won’t change if there is no more federal DOE. Can you name one federal education program that has been good? I can’t think of any. Even the federal money for school lunches (sounds nice, doesn’t it) just goes to subsidize industrial agriculture (wheat and dairy, no vegetables) and promotes obesity in the schools. What public education needs is tougher state requirements for teaching licenses (no automatic tenure after two years!), and then we can give the professionals more autonomy in the classroom.

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      1. Nancarrow

        Tori, please look at the success of Finland’s educational system. The answer to our problems is right there. They have figured out how to do it right, on a National level. Its quite easy really, just takes emulating them and doing it the right way.

        http://schoolmatters.knoxnews.com/forum/topics/how-does-finlands-education

        http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/8601207.stm

        http://www.suite101.com/content/why-finland-is-first-in-education-a96642

        http://www.huffingtonpost.com/justin-snider/finland-education-system_b_794644.html

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        1. Tori Alexander

          Finland’s population is what? 4 or 5 million? NYC has a population of about 8 million. Let’s not compare apples to oranges. Most of the Finnish population is over 50 so they have relatively few people to educate. As far as I know, Finland has a flexible curriculum, with a lot of autonomy at the municipal level. If we abandoned plans for a national curriculum, we will increase autonomy at the local level in the US and this would be more in line with what Finland is doing.

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  28. 60srad

    Correction: “Too late”–your developers neglected to provide an Edit option at a time when millions of talented geeks are unemployed due to the fallout of three decades of deregulation. Fortunately, I am no longer among them.

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  29. 60srad

    This will inevitably lead to more home-schooling, more inbred ignorance, and less interaction with those who question. It will also doom us to repeating historic mistakes through a failure to learn from them and return us to the days of the Robber Barons. Oops! To late!

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    1. Tori Alexander

      Actually, homeschooling is up by 70% in recent years because middle-class people who want a good education for their children do not want to send them to public schools. I am home-schooling my son, and I am not religious; I want him to be literate. The Federal DOE gave us the “No Child Left Behind” program which gives more money to the students who are already doing well and less money to students who are in trouble academically. Do we really need that?

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  30. alton smith

    Roderick Anderson? Yes You could, but seriously the book of mormon. why would you limit your childs potential.

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    1. Kevin Rogers

      I don’t think the original poster was implying that educating kids with the book of Mormon is a good idea. He is stating that allowing local community leaders dictate their child’s education could lead to fringe societies providing an incomplete or in some cases inaccurate education to their child. I for one would not want my child to taught anything based on ANY religious texts (that includes the Bible) because as far as I’m concerned, its all made up.

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      1. Scott

        You’re right. And there is nothing wrong with that. It should be that way and a part of our personal liberties. It’s not up to the federal government to tell us what we can or can not teach. “Fringe” groups as you put it will be around teaching no matter what the government does. All the DOE does is drop the standards of the whole nation in the education department.

        If it was up to the local and state for education, more would be done. Local government would run a education system that would promote people to live there. Too much worry is given to the “fringe” groups and not enough credit to the local communities on how much better our education system would be if the DOE wasn’t controlling it.

        Remember, in the end the D.O.E. ISN’T about providing better education. It’s about people getting elected, re-elected and special interest groups. Sure, No Child Left Behind is great in theory, sounds good in a speech, but it’s about politics. This is where people don’t get it and why big government doesn’t work.

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  31. Rachel

    Ron Paul,
    More and more frequently, I hear of people I know deciding to support your campaign. When I heard your slogan, “Revolution”, I thought, “Now there is a terrible idea!”
    However, after having read a little about your views, I’m beginning to understand their decisions. If you win your campaign, I hope you work to put the power and knowledge in the hands of the people, especially the people who care.

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  32. Zach

    Ron Paul has some very radical ideas, but like we’ve seen with Obama, what are the chances he can get anything done? We shouldn’t be debating on a candidates rhetoric. When I bet on a football team, I don’t do it based on how good the coaches pep-talk was before the game. Sorry to use a football analogy, but it seems fitting to me.

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    1. streamfortyseven

      He can abolish Executive Branch agencies with the stroke of a pen, or reorganize them, or repeal regulations: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unitary_executive_theory

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  33. Zach

    I like how Ron really goes in-depth on all the issues. lol

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  34. roderick anderson

    so does ron paul endorse the education of mormon children in one room school houses using only the ‘book of mormon’ as a guide? the more i read about this guy the less i like him.

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    1. Tori Alexander

      There are state requirements for all children who are homeschooled. They are required to get English, math, science and history. I believe private religious schools also the same requirements. Homeschooling has risen by 70% in recent years and it’s not just religious families anymore. Homeschool is the middle class answer to a good private education. Public schools don’t teach critical thinking. By and large, they don’t turn out students with anything like functioning science literacy. For example, how does America answer this question: Can falling concrete fall through solid concrete, pulverizing it as it goes, as near free-fall speed? Our country is a disaster academically. Anybody as President would be better than someone from the Bush-Obama administration. Ron Paul is going for the Fed which is the jugular of the corrupt government body. The worst thing that could happen with Paul is that some states might vote against pro-choice and some women would have to drive across state lines. But maybe non-profit organizations will spring up in those areas to help those women. That’s the “free market” way, I guess, the way Paul seems to look at these things. That’s not a great situation, but it is not as bad as what we are going to experience if NeoCon-Socialism continues to get more and more control.

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    2. John C

      Why do you want to force others to have your values through the use of government laws backed by threat of police force and imprisonment? Though your ideas to have laws to force parents to educate children in a specific way is well intentioned, there’s no way to enforce that law without use of an armed police force. That sounds like fascism/communism to me. Smiley faced as it is, it’s still fascism/communism.

      Freedom means freedom. Freedom is not for talking about the weather, it is for doing controversial things. You can’t have freedom AND force others to do what you want them to do against their will.

      Yes, freedom means that others will do things you don’t approve of. If you care about them, you will try persuade them to do things your way by setting a good example and through non-violent argument/discussion and education, not through police force and threat of imprisonment. That’s how North Korea controls its population.

      People, let’s work towards freedom, not towards control through force.

      Please go to http://www.mises.org to educate yourself about free markets, true liberalism (libertarianism), and Austrian economics, before you set your opinion about Ron Paul in stone.

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      1. Wonk

        Couldnt of said it better myself. But thats probably because Ive heard RP use that “weather” example :).

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      2. Rachel

        John C,
        Who is forcing who, to do what? Currently, there are a lot of guidelines on parents. Highly restrictive ones. Last year, as a single parent and sole guardian, I went through surgery. I received a truancy citation and threats, because the volunteer babysitters didn’t manage to get my children to school on time.
        In other areas? I parked my legally registered car in front of my own home. In the middle of the night, my registration sticker was ripped off of my car and in the same night, my car received a parking ticket. Even though my registration is current, and there is sticky residue left on the plate, showing that a sticker was once there, I still have to pay for a parking ticket!
        Two years ago, I was a designated driver. I picked up a friend from a bar, so she wouldn’t drive. Later that night, 8 police officers showed up at my house to arrest me for kidnapping. The “kidnap victim” was chatting on my phone, a year older than me, and oh yes, I was 5 months pregnant. After they made the mistake, they continued to lecture me about my decision to be at the bar….where I helped to keep an intoxicated woman off of the streets!
        You can make bold statements and go on blindly believing that America doesn’t need change, but you’re breeding ignorance. This nation was built on the backs of people who wanted a land where people could believe what they want, and live as they want…as long as it is not harming others. We DON’T have that. Our laws and the enforcement of such laws, have become highly restrictive and overbearing.
        If you don’t believe this, then walk into a courtroom. You can’t just speak plainly with a judge. You have to know the legal jargon to defend yourself, whether innocent or guilty. There is no such thing as a fair trial. Only education and money can protect a person now. Let’s change it while we still can!

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        1. John C

          Rachel,
          I’m not sure why this letter is addressed to me. Maybe you misread my comment. I am not advocating laws enforced by police force. I am pointing out that to do so is in the same vein as communism and fascism.

          My comment was in response to the proponents of government compulsory education of children: it is unconstitutional and a really bad idea.

          I entirely agree with you, Rachel. We need to take the monopoly of police and judges away from the government. The optimal way to do this is to allow for competition. In other words, privatize them without regulations. To learn more about this go to mises.org and read or listen to Hans Hermann Hoppe on the subject.

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    3. Rachel

      Mr Anderson,
      Perhaps it would be wise to research religions from reliable sources, as opposed to wild rumors. Also, while attempting to mock others’ abilities to educate their own, perhaps another wise choice would be to use proper English.
      My unsolicited opinion, is that Ron Paul’s statement is actually a very good one. There may be communities that would suffer, but it’s not likely to be as severe as it is now. I appreciate the choices that educators in my area are making, such as the decision to start French and Spanish immersion programs.
      The biggest mistake people can make, is to take away their own rights to decide. Our government is supposed to be for THE PEOPLE. Unfortunately, the people are so poorly educated, that when a politician fights for our rights, by providing us with options like school vouchers, which would give us the freedom to choose where and how our children are educated, we fail to vote for freedom. If you think that putting education or parenting decisions in our own hands is a bad idea, turn off your television and go read a book, a non-fiction book!

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    4. Anarchist

      Please cite references regarding Mormon children getting their education in a one room school house from the book of Mormon. It obviously was a good education considering their work ethic, resourcefulness and financial success. Amish children function very well in society after receiving their education in a one room community centered school house. I think we could learn something from them.
      I think it’s called family/local control of education.

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    5. Rachel

      Mr. Anderson,
      I can’t find any information, provided Ron Paul, stating that he believes that any one way would be best. He’s simply saying that we should be able to educate our own children, without laws and restrictions in regards to education, that govern an entire country. Most parents know that each child, even within the same family, can be very different. How could one set of guidelines possibly work best for each child in the nation? Simple answer…it doesn’t. The American people are poorly educated. A lot of school systems are failing, as they try to strive to meet the requirements as set by federal guidelines. It is time for change!

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    6. LaRee

      The point is to get the FEDS OUT of what the States want. State= We The People
      FEDS= BIG BROTHER I teach Montessori/ Alternative Style Living… This means organic hippy mama to the core! And as a homeschooling mother I think it is important for me to have a say in what I teach my children. When the States have the power the people have more power!!

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  35. Josh L.

    The Federal Government is full of politicians who do not have a clue about education. States and counties can regulate education much more efficiently. They can pin-point the problems existing where they live. The government mandating education can’t be done effectively. Each state is different, the kids and enviornments are different, and the government can’t focus on all the schools like they should. State and counties can focus specifically on their students and better assess the problems and work on fixing them.

    Money shouldn’t be an issue. Our Founding Fathers were brilliant men. They made it by, in class, with a chalk board and a library. We don’t need all these computers and smart-boards. Society has gotten lazy. Kids don’t need the new technology. It’s great and useful but not necessary. Teachers shouldn’t let their pay affect how they teach; success isn’t making a whole lot of money or being famous but doing what you love doing and making a difference.

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    1. Caryn

      To Josh L – Technology is all around us, all the time. It is necessary to maintain our standard of living and to continue to be competitive globally. Technological advances have literally changed the way we live every day, and before you argue with me, consider that you’ve posted your comment online. I don’t know where you’re from, but we could be having a conversation from across the world because of advances in communcations technology. Sure, a chalk board and a library sound all pure and old-fashioned to some people, but there was a time when the printing press was the hot new technology, so please don’t pretend that the way the founding fathers lived is the way anyone wants to live now. I think we all enjoy our antibiotics in the 21st century.

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